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Business Analyst => Business Analyst Concepts Discussion => Topic started by: 171119402 on April 20, 2017, 07:47:02 pm

Title: How do we write a effective user story ?
Post by: 171119402 on April 20, 2017, 07:47:02 pm
Normally user stories should be short and developers should understand it easilt. But where do we capture the conditions and other criteria to meet this user story?
Example : As a passenger i want to login to the flight system to search flights.
So where do we capture all the conditions and criteria to match the login details etc?
Title: Re: How do we write a effective user story ?
Post by: 170123204 on July 09, 2017, 01:54:43 pm
Writing user stories is dead simple if you follow these simple steps:

1. As a [role], I can [feature] so that [reason]

When writing user stories, using this pattern is a for sure bullseye. Let’s look at an example:

As a account owner, I can check my balance online so that I can keep a daily balance 24 hours a day.

Pretty easy right? However, in some instances I find that the “so that” suffix reads redundantly so go ahead and have that be optional if you wish.

As a account owner, I can check my balance online.
Title: Re: How do we write a effective user story ?
Post by: 172624703 on July 17, 2017, 11:27:40 am
Here’s how to actually write them.

I.N.V.E.S.T.

The I.N.V.E.S.T. guideline to writing user stories is almost universally accepted as the standard to work by. The acronym was made popular by Bill Wake’s original article from 2003.

(I)ndepdendent: You should be able to prioritize and rearrange user stories in any way with no overlap or confusion.

(N)egotiable: As previously discussed, a good user story can be reworked or modified to best suit the business. User stories are not an explicit set of tasks.

(V)aluable: User stories need to be valuable. By this, we mean valuable for the business or the customer. If it’s not, why would you have your team work on it?   

(E)stimable: A good user story can be estimated. It’s also important to differentiate time estimations from an exact timeframe. A rough estimate is beneficial to allow teams to rank and schedule their priorities. At Sprintly, we allow users to categorize their stories and sub-items into sizes (small/medium/large/extra large) so that they can better prioritize their stories.

(S)mall: We definitely recommend keeping your user stories small. While we don’t suggest an exact timeframe to stay in, writing user stories that focus on smaller tasks allows for greater focus. The larger a story is, the harder it is to estimate and easier it is to get caught up in sub items that should have probably been their own stories.

(T)estable: Before a user story is written, it is essential that a criteria to test it is in place. Outlining the testability first ensures that the story actually accomplishes the goal you are trying to achieve. A story is not finished until it is tested. For maximum productivity and team alignment, make sure your team knows how their work will be tested.

We tend to view testability as the fourth major component of a user story. Having your team know your stories’ testing parameters beforehand plays a big role in how they decide to take it on.

Sub-items

With I.N.V.E.S.T. in mind, you can now start thinking about writing user stories. At Sprintly we consider any project that contains sub-components a good candidate for a user story. Sub-items are tasks or tests you can list under your user story to provide a clearer vision of what needs to be done before the user story is complete.

Once again, it’s important to remember that everything about a user story, including its sub-items, can be reworked to best fit the needs of your business. Sub-items are great for providing additional direction and details for what needs to be done. Take this user story for example:

As a User
I want an easy way to export my data into CSV
So that I can analyze usage data outside of the tool
Title: Re: How do we write a effective user story ?
Post by: 172031605 on August 02, 2017, 04:28:27 pm
User stories are probably the most popular agile technique to capture product functionality: Working with user stories is easy. But telling effective stories can be hard. The following ten tips help you create good stories
1. User come first
2. Use personas to discover right stories first
3. Create stories collaboratively
4. Keep your stories simple and concise
5. Start with Epics
6. Refine the story until they are ready
7. Add acceptance criteria
8. Use paper cards
9. Keep your stories visible and accessible
10. Don't solely relay on user stories
Title: Re: How do we write a effective user story ?
Post by: 1171625709 on December 27, 2017, 12:38:43 pm
The ability to write effective user stories enables teams to delivering the right products fast. This post provides several checklists for writing effective user stories and features the perfection game, a technique for giving feedback and providing improvement suggestions to improve your user stories.

Effective user stories express the needs of users and support effective communication and collaboration between product owners and agile teams.  They are prompts for communication which help to understand users and develop the right products.

INVEST
The INVEST checklist comes from  INVEST in Good Stories by Bill Wake. It’s an acronym with six important quality characteristics for user stories:

A good user story is:
I – Independent
N – Negotiable
V – Valuable
E – Estimable
S – Small
T – Testable

Three Big Questions
The User Story Checklist by AgileKRC is for use on ‘mature’ user stories which have undergone some discussion. These three big questions can be used to check if a user story is ready:

1.Immediately after reading the User Story is it obvious what the User Story is about?
2.Does each element of the User Story add significant value and therefore avoids duplication or partial duplication of other elements?
3.Is it totally 100% free of ‘the how’/the solution?

in this way, you can definitely write an effective user stories
Title: Re: How do we write a effective user story ?
Post by: 1171921109 on January 21, 2018, 09:18:53 pm
User stories are short, simple descriptions of a feature told from the perspective of the person who desires the new capability, usually a user or customer of the system. They typically follow a simple template:

As a < type of user >, I want < some goal > so that < some reason >.

User stories are often written on index cards or sticky notes, stored in a shoe box, and arranged on walls or tables to facilitate planning and discussion. As such, they strongly shift the focus from writing about features to discussing them. In fact, these discussions are more important than whatever text is written.

One of the benefits of agile user stories is that they can be written at varying levels of detail. We can write a user story to cover large amounts of functionality. These large user stories are generally known as epics. Here is an epic agile user story example from a desktop backup product:

As a user, I can backup my entire hard drive.
Because an epic is generally too large for an agile team to complete in one iteration, it is split into multiple smaller user stories before it is worked on. The epic above could be split into dozens (or possibly hundreds), including these two:

As a power user, I can specify files or folders to backup based on file size, date created and date modified.
As a user, I can indicate folders not to backup so that my backup drive isn't filled up with things I don't need to be saved.
Title: Re: How do we write a effective user story ?
Post by: 1172202407 on February 08, 2018, 11:20:39 am
For me User stories should be short which should be one liner and it has to capture main and important requirement of that case study or scenario.

For one case study or scenario we can have multiple user stories. This will help developer to understand quickly the requirement of the client and he can work on it.

So user stories should be short and it is the responsibility of the Business Analyst to develop it so.
Title: Re: How do we write a effective user story ?
Post by: 1171948312 on February 13, 2018, 04:08:59 pm
In order to write an effective user story, we should write it as follows:-

As a [    ] I want to [      ]  So that [    ]
Title: Re: How do we write a effective user story ?
Post by: 1172831810 on April 07, 2018, 04:44:09 pm
A User Story describes a feature, or requirement, that is to be implemented and is independent of a specific tool (i.e. JIRA, Rally, Trello, etc.). User stories are employed in various Agile frameworks including Scrum, Kanban, and Extreme Programming.

User stories should be written as small, independently, testable increments of the business need, and prioritized by the Product Owner. While Product Owners write functional user stories, the Scrum Team can contribute non-functional / technical stories. However, any non-functional user stories added to the Backlog must also be vetted and prioritized by the Product Owner. Overall, user stories should enable conversation between the Product Owner, Scrum Team, and business group(s).

Writing User Stories

During Sprint Grooming, groups of features / requirements, or Epics, are broken down into user stories by the Product Owner. Then Sprint Planning is used to estimate the level of effort to complete a user story through tasking by the Scrum Team.

The user story is a short, simple description of a feature or function written from the perspective of the end user:

As a [ type of user ], I want [ some goal, function ] so that [ some reason ].

An example:

As a Leasing Specialist, I want the ability to upload an SF-81 document so that I can attach it to my lease file.

When writing a user story, it requires key content:


Independent

A common software principle known as Separation of Concerns, refers to the isolation of problems or concerns that should be solved individually. This principle can also apply to a user story which highlights one particular feature closely and is kept independent. This isn’t always possible in some websites or applications, but it should always be considered.

Negotiable

The point of running Agile is to keep flexibility an option. An effective User Story should be negotiable, allowing for collaboration between designers, developers, and product owners. Each team member will provide special insights that can help refine details throughout the lifecycle of a story.

Valuable

User Stories should be valuable to the User Persona they are targeting. If the story does not offer a valuable benefit after it’s completion, it would not be considered effective to the User Persona or the Business Organization.

Estimable

When using effective User Stories, the team should be capable of estimating the effort it will take to achieve the scope of work. Clearly defined stories, that are sized appropriately help to improve their estimate feasibility.

Small

User Stories should be sized appropriately which allows for clarity, portability, and team consumption. You wouldn’t build an entire wall at at once - lay one brick at a time.

Testable

User Stories should be worded in such a way that allows for testability. Clearly identify how the User Story will be tested using verbs and present participles like:

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Title: Re: How do we write a effective user story ?
Post by: 1182057301 on May 19, 2018, 09:42:04 am
The effective user stories enables teams to deliver right products fast by following effective checklist :
1. User comes first: As name suggest these describes how a user employs the product , So user to be considered first .
2. Keeping Stories simple and concise: Writing stories that are simple and concise  is the most effective way as it avoids confusion and ambiguity.The stories needs to be written in active voice and should be focused on what is important.
3.Create Stories Collaboratively: User stories are intended as light weight technique and they should be embedded in a conversation.The product owner and the team should discuss the stories together as it allows  to capture minimum amount of information,reduce overhead and accelerate delivery.
4.Starting with EPICS: An epic is a big sketchy,coarse grained story.Starting with epics allows to sketch the product functionality without committing to the details which helps in describing new products and features.It also reduces time and effort required to integrate new insights.
5.User story should be INVEST(Independent,Negotiable,Valuable,Estimable,Small,Testable)

Title: Re: How do we write a effective user story ?
Post by: 1181278305 on July 11, 2018, 10:11:59 pm
User stories are short, simple descriptions of a feature told from the perspective of the person who desires the new capability, usually a user or customer of the system. They typically follow a simple template:

As a < type of user >, I want < some goal > so that < some reason >.

User stories are often written on index cards or sticky notes, stored in a shoe box, and arranged on walls or tables to facilitate planning and discussion. As such, they strongly shift the focus from writing about features to discussing them.

Agile projects, especially Scrum ones, use a product backlog, which is a prioritized list of the functionality to be developed in a product or service. Although product backlog items can be whatever the team desires, user stories have emerged as the best and most popular form of product backlog items.
Title: Re: How do we write a effective user story ?
Post by: 1181698407 on March 30, 2020, 07:20:15 pm
Validate the Needs of the Users. The client first must clearly define the users who will use the application.
Create Epics.
Writing User Stories.
Defining Acceptance Criteria.
Title: Re: How do we write a effective user story ?
Post by: 1200473401 on April 06, 2020, 10:19:54 am
Below is the format to write a user story
As a [role], I can [feature] so that [reason]
And this user story should be short and precise and should be easy to understand
Title: Re: How do we write a effective user story ?
Post by: 1191364504 on April 07, 2020, 10:46:56 am
Example.
AS A USER I WANT TO LOGIN
SO THAT
I CAN ACCESS THE APPLICATION.

AS A USER..... SO THAT.....I CAN.....

This is the format for user story.
Title: Re: How do we write a effective user story ?
Post by: 1202990202 on May 30, 2020, 11:21:45 am
User stories serve a number of key benefits:

Stories keep the focus on the user. A To Do list keeps the team focused on tasks that need checked off, but a collection of stories keeps the team focused on solving problems for real users.
 
Stories enable collaboration. With the end goal defined, the team can work together to decide how best to serve the user and meet that goal.
 
Stories drive creative solutions. Stories encourage the team to think critically and creatively about how to best solve for an end goal.
 
Stories create momentum. With each passing story the development team enjoys a small challenges and a small win, driving momentum. 
Title: Re: How do we write a effective user story ?
Post by: 1202894803 on June 04, 2020, 11:16:01 pm
the things we should care  about before writing a user story:
?understand the requirement
?draw use case diagram
?draw activity diagram
?try to understand the whole scenario
?start writing from First use case
?consider things accordingly
Title: Re: How do we write a effective user story ?
Post by: 1192091407 on June 05, 2020, 06:22:14 pm
Any Example of Validation?
Title: Re: How do we write a effective user story ?
Post by: 1202988902 on June 18, 2020, 03:36:35 pm
User stories are simple, one-line benefits statements of a valuable function. Prior to writing the user story, conduct user surveys and interviews to query the user about needed functionality. Start by writing a customer journey, stated in incremental stories, on 3x5-inch cards or Post-it notes. These cards can be put immediately into production or provide context for the backlog.

In the case of user story mapping, you can display Post-it notes along a conference room wall so the entire team can see it and work on long-range planning.

There are a few techniques you can use to help write the stories you need. A common technique is the Role-Feature-Reason or Benefit (RGB) structure that you construct by filling in the blanks of this sentence:

As a (user/persona/customer), I want to (do something) so that I will (receive a benefit).
Adding to the RGB question is a method pioneered by Ron Jeffries which highlights his ?three C approach:?

Card: Write the answer to the RGB (described above) on the card.
Conversation: The limited detail on the card is the basis of a promise fulfilled by the second C. During this phase, the team discusses the details and establishes a definition of ?done.?
Confirmation: This is the result of feedback that determines the test or acceptance criteria. This acceptance criterion is often written on the back of the card and is used as the initial checklist during future meetings to determine completion.
First introduced in an article by Bill Wake in 2003 and popularized by Mike Cohn?s book, User Stories Applied for Agile Software Development, the acronym INVEST is a method to evaluate user stories. INVEST criteria is as follows:   

Independence to develop in any sequence.
Ability to Negotiate the extent of the story to develop.
Provides Value to the user or business. 
Can be Estimated for completion.
Is Small enough to design, code, and test in a single iteration.
And finally, can be Tested.
Title: Re: How do we write a effective user story ?
Post by: 1202408706 on September 22, 2020, 10:11:13 pm
A user story has an equation followed by
As a <type of user>, I want <some feature> so that <some reason>
As a <type of user> ? this is the WHO. Who are we building this for? Who is the user?
I want <some feature> ? this is the WHAT. What are we building? What is the intention?
so that <some reason> ? this is they WHY. Why are we building it? What is the value for the customer?

Eample:
As an internet banking customer
I want to see a rolling balance for my everyday accounts
So that I can keep track of my spending after each transaction is applied