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Business Analyst => Business Analyst Concepts Discussion => Topic started by: Gajanan Sharnappa on June 12, 2017, 09:10:19 pm

Title: Elicitation Techniques in Business Analysis
Post by: Gajanan Sharnappa on June 12, 2017, 09:10:19 pm
Elicitation techniques are used to get most of the information about requirements from stakeholders, subject matter experts (SME).
These are proactive in nature as against requirements gathering. Elicitation is a technique which span across all the stages of project lifecycle.
Some of the commonly used techniques are-
1. Brainstorming (Brainstorming works by focusing on a topic or problem, and then coming up with many radical solutions to it. This technique is best applied in a group as it draws on the experience and creativity of all members of the group)

2. Document analysis (Document analysis is a means to elicit requirements of an existing system by studying available documentation and identifying relevant information. Document analysis is used if the objective is to gather details of the "As Is" environment such as existing business rules)

3. Focus groups (A focus group is composed of pre-qualified individuals whose purpose is to discuss and comment on a topic. This is an opportunity for individuals to share their own perspectives and discuss them in a group setting.)

4. Interface analysis (Interface analysis helps to clarify the boundaries of the system. It distinguishes which system provides specific functionality along with the input and output data needs.)

5. Interview (An interview is a systematic approach to elicit information from a person or group of people in an informal or formal setting by talking to the person. In an interview, a business analyst formally or informally directs his/her questions to: a stakeholder / a subject-matter-expert / a potential user to obtain answers that finally take the shape of requirements)

6. Observation (Observation is a means to elicit requirements by conducting an assessment of the subject matter expert's work environment.)

7. Prototyping (aims to uncover and visualize interface requirements before the application is designed or developed)

8. Survey / Questionnaire (A survey is a means of eliciting information from many people, anonymously, in a relatively short time. A survey can collect information about customers, products, work practices and attitudes. A survey is often referred to as a questionnaire.)
Title: Re: Elicitation Techniques in Business Analysis
Post by: 170422303 on July 02, 2017, 10:58:54 pm
Various elicitation techniques provided by business analyst are:

*Brainstorming
*Document Analysis
*Focus Groups
*Interface Analysis
*Interviews
*Observation
*Prototyping
*Requirements Workshops
*Survey/Questionnaire
Title: Re: Elicitation Techniques in Business Analysis
Post by: 171525904 on July 04, 2017, 11:56:12 am
Different types of elicitation  technique are used to gather information from stake holder.Multiple elicitation can be Techniques together to elicit information from stake holder.eliciting technique are selected based on many factors ,geographical location of stake holders, Time,costs type of business analysis information sources are available.

1)Brain storming:brain storming technique contain group of stake holders to give deep thought about particular topic.This technique basically useful in developing new ideas.

2)Document analysis:document analysis is technique of gathering information from the documents of existing system.

3)Reverse engineering: reverse engineering technique is used when document of existing system is pretty outdated and has very less information.reverse engineering is technique of studying current system and what it does .studying current system can be done in two ways it can be studied without examining internal structure or by examining internal structure. 

4)Focus Group.It is technique describe what attitude specific group of people has for product,services.In interactive season participant share their impression,preferences and needs.Focus group os classified in two types of group Homogeneous group  with similar skills and same back ground and heterogeneous group with different skills and different back ground people.

5)Work Shop:workshop allow bringing user and stake holder to gather and conversation are happened in more innovative tasks for example:collaborative games, tasks.

6)JAD: JAD is conducted by bringing Stake holder and developer together at same place.JAD provide high accurate level of requirement.Though JAD are conducted for different types purpose in SDLC JAD is Mostly conducted in two Ways, One is as eliciting technique and second is to clarify development teams doubts.

7)Interview:This technique allow to systematically gather information from individual or from group of stake holder.Interview are conducted in both formal and informal way.

8)Questionnaire: questionnaire contains sets of per-defined questions.This technique is utilized when stake holder are geographically distributed and there is less scope of conversation.This technique is limited to nominal and limited information.

9)Prototyping: Prototyping is Visual presentation of Idea or requirement which gives clear picture of requirements. Visual Presentation are given terms Mock-up screens or graphical designed or requirement prototype.

10)Observation:Information is gathered by observing stakeholder while they are working.This technique gives good understanding of process and work stakeholder do.
Title: Re: Elicitation Techniques in Business Analysis
Post by: 172031605 on August 02, 2017, 04:39:37 pm

    Brainstorming
    Document Analysis
    Focus Groups
    Interface Analysis
    Interviews
    Observation
    Prototyping
    Requirements Workshops
    Survey/Questionnaire
Title: Re: Elicitation Techniques in Business Analysis
Post by: Pranjal Dutta on August 31, 2017, 04:23:57 pm
Elicitation Technique is used by the Business Analyst after identification of the stakeholders of the project. Through this technique the requirements are gathered from the selected stakeholders. There are some techniques are mentioned below:

a) Brainstorming: group discussion among stakeholders to collect ideas to include the relevant requirements.
b) JAD session: the session conduct among selected stakeholders (business client+system developer) to get more refined requirements.
c) Observation: observing the user while doing their job. It helps to understand the existing processes.
d) Focal Group: Focal group is group of participant of same interest from the specific product/service. The idea is to make participant share, interact and describe the need.
e) Workshop: group of selected stakeholders (Users) to interact and identifies the requirements together.
f) Document Analysis: analyze the documents of the current existing system and come up with new inputs for new system.
g) Reverse Engineering: in case of lack of documents for existing system, reverse engineering technique can be used to understand the current system and can come up with requirements for new system.
i) Prototyping: it helps the business representative to understand clearly the new system and its functionality per stakeholder’s requirement in visual rather than documents.
h) Interview: is the one to one interaction with the User/stakeholder to understand their actual requirement or expectation.
Title: Re: Elicitation Techniques in Business Analysis
Post by: 111222333 on September 19, 2017, 03:49:51 pm
Elicitation Techniques in Business Analysis :-

1. Brainstorming : Brainstorming can be done either individually or in groups. The ideas collected can then be reviewed/analyzed and where relevant included within the system requirements.

2. Document Analysis : You may have documentation about your current system which could provide some of the input for the new system requirements. Such document could include interface details, user manuals and software vendor manuals

3. Reverse Engineering : In situations where the software for an existing system has little or outdated documentation and it is necessary to understand what the system actually does, reverse engineering is an elicitation technique that can extract process documents and also when driving the gap analysis for scoping of the migration projects.

4. Focus Groups : A focus group is a means to elicit ideas and attitudes about a specific product, service or oppurtunity in an interactive group environment. The participants share their impressions, preferences and needs, guided by a moderator.

5. Observation : Observing, shadowing users or even doing part of their job, can provide information of existing processes, inputs and outputs.

6. Workshop : Workshops can comprise 6-10 or more users/stakeholders, working together to identify requirements. Workshops tend to be of a defined duration, rather than outcome and may need to be briefly repeated in order to clarify or obtain further details.

7. JAD (Joint Application Document) : JAD technique is an extended, facilatated workshop. It involves collaboration between stakeholders and systems analysts to identify needs or requirements in a concentrated and focused effort.

8. Interview : Interviews of users and stakeholders are important in creating wonderful software. Without knowing the expectations and goal of the stakeholders and users, you are highly unlikely to satiate them.

9. Prototyping : Screen mockups can support the requirement gathering process when introduced at the right time.

10. Questionnaire(Survey) : Questionnaires can be usefu for obtaining limited system requirements details from users/stakeholders, who have a minor input or are geographically remote.
Title: Re: Elicitation Techniques in Business Analysis
Post by: 170832105 on October 18, 2017, 09:29:01 am
Requirements of elicitation technique is the process of digging information from Stakeholders.
Some of the important Techniques used by Business Analyst are as follows
(01)Document Analysis: Every system would or may have documentation which can provide input for the new system requirements like that of manuals,warranty,interface details,cd’s etc.
Advantages *      could be lot of information and easy to transfer to a new requirements.
Disadvantage *   existing documentation may be old and not compatible to new requirements.
(02)Interviews: Interviews of stakeholders and users are very important in developing an important software.Various types of interview again are classified as
•   Open
•   Closed
•   Unstructured
•   Structured
(03)Focus Groups : Focus group is a mean to elicit ideas and attitudes about a specific product,service or opportunity in a interactive group environment.Normally comprises of 6-12 attendees.These again are classified into two types.
•   Homogeneous: Individuals with similar characters
•   Heterogeneous: Individuals with diverse back grounds
(04)Brainstorming:This technique can be done individually or in groups.The ideas reviewed can be collected and analysed. If required included with in a requirement. Ideas can come from stakeholders,users who have seen or experienced elsewhere.It comprises of 8-12 in a relaxed environment.
Advantages* Can come up with very innovative ideas and requirements. Disadvantage *It can not be done whenever required.
(05)Workshops:It comprises of 6-10 or more users or stakeholders working together to identify requirements.It is done in a defined duration.
(06)Prototyping:Screen mockups that support requirements are gathered at right time.In case introduced earlier can be problematic.
(07)Reverse Engineering : Reverse engineering is all about experimenting things like disassemble or analyse in detail. This elicitation technique can extract process documents while driving gap analysis for scoping of migration Projects.
(08)Observation: Observing or shadowing users at work can give some insight about the existing process like its inputs and ouputs.It is again divided into two types.
•   Passive : BA observes the subject mater expert working on business routine but does not ask questions.
•   Active: BA have participation with current process.
(09)JAD (Joint Application Development)Session :This is an extended facilitated workshop.It involves collaboration b/w stakeholders and system analysts to identify needs or requirements in a concentrated  focused environment.This is mainly mainly observed if they are “stuck with the same problem”.
(10)Questionnaire:Useful for obtaining Limited system requirements from users or stakeholders who have a minor input  or are geographically remote.The design  of questionnaires (whether offline or web based mailers) and types of questions are very important and can influence the answers. So proper care is needed.
Title: Re: Elicitation Techniques in Business Analysis
Post by: 1170220109 on October 18, 2017, 04:58:56 pm
Elicitation technique is the process of digging out the information from the stakeholders. It serves as the foundation in documenting the requirements.
The elicitation techniques are:
1)Brainstorming
2)Document Analysis
3)Reverse Engineering
   i) Black Box Reverse Engineering
   ii)White Box Reverse Engineering
4)Focus Groups
5)Observation
  i) Passive/Invisible
  ii) Active/Visible
6)Workshop
7)JAD sessions
8)Interview
9)Prototyping
10)Questionnaire(Survey)
6)
Title: Re: Elicitation Techniques in Business Analysis
Post by: 171034206 on October 27, 2017, 10:28:37 pm
Various elicitation techniques are as follows:
1) brainstorming
2) Document analysis
3) Reverse engineering
4) Focus groups
5) Observation
6) Workshop
7) JAD(joint application development)
8) Interview
9) Prototyping
10) Questionnaire(survey)
Title: Re: Elicitation Techniques in Business Analysis
Post by: 171036906 on November 11, 2017, 08:48:42 am
Here are the 9 elicitation techniques defined by the BABOK for business analysts:

Brainstorming
Document Analysis
Focus Groups
Interface Analysis
Interviews
Observation
Prototyping
Requirements Workshops
Survey/Questionnaire

Many new BAs feel they should be using all of the techniques and are worried they aren’t getting elicitation right. Or, they think about their experience in this area and it seems that most of the time they get information about stakeholder needs through casual conversations and reviews, so their experience with elicitation seems a bit informal.

This is an area of business analysis that it’s very common for professionals to have relevant experience in. It’s also an area where even the most senior BAs never stop improving.
Title: Re: Elicitation Techniques in Business Analysis
Post by: 1171429110 on December 07, 2017, 04:49:32 pm
Here are the 9 elicitation techniques in  business analysis

Brainstorming
Document Analysis
Focus Groups
Interface Analysis
Interviews
Observation
Prototyping
Requirements Workshops
Survey/Questionnaire
Title: Re: Elicitation Techniques in Business Analysis
Post by: VIJAY POGULA on December 11, 2017, 11:29:25 am
Elicitation techniques:
    Requirements elicitation is the process of digging out the information from the stakeholders. Elicitation serves as the foundation in documenting the requirements. Following are the different types of elicitation techniques.
     * Brainstorming ( For example Bright idea drive)
     * Document Analysis
     * Reverse Engineering
     * Work shops
     * JAD (joint application development)
     * Focus groups
     * Interview
     * Prototyping, Observation & Questionnaire
Title: Re: Elicitation Techniques in Business Analysis
Post by: 1171625709 on December 27, 2017, 12:35:19 pm
Elicitation tasks and techniques are very important for a business analyst. Knowing the different tasks and techniques used can make the difference between a junior and a senior business analyst. Here are some common effective elicitation techniques

Brainstorming – A team activity that seeks to product a broad or diverse set of options through the rapid and uncritical generation of ideas.

Document Analysis – Review existing documentation – Document Analysis is a means to elicit requirements of an existing system by studying available documentation and identifying relevant information

Focus Groups – A focus group is a means to elicit ideas and attitudes about a specific product, service or opportunity in an interactive group environment. The participants share their impressions, preferences and needs, guided by a moderator.

Interface analysis – Used to identify interfaces between solutions and/or solution components and define requirements that describe how they will interact.

Interviews – an interview is a systematic approach designed to elicit information from a person or group of people in an informal or formal setting by talking to an interviewee, asking relevant questions and documenting the responses.

Observations – e.g. Job shadowing – Observation is a means of eliciting requirements by conducting an assessment of the stakeholder’s work environment. This technique is appropriate when documenting details about current processed or if the project is intended to enhance or change a current process.

Prototyping – Storyboarding, navigation flow, paper prototyping, screen flows – Prototyping details user interface requirements and integrates them with other requirements such as use cases, scenarios, data, and business rules. Stakeholders often find prototyping to be a concrete means of identifying, describing and validating their interface needs.

Requirements Workshop – Elicitation workshop, facilitated workshop – A requirements workshop is a structured way to capture requirements. A workshop may be used to scope, discover, define, prioritize and reach closure on requirements for the target system.
Well-run workshops are considered one of the most effective ways to deliver high quality requirements quickly. They can promote trust, mutual understanding, and strong communications among the project stakeholders and project team and produce deliverables that structure and guide future analysis.

Survey/Questionnaire – A survey is a means of eliciting information from many people, sometimes anonymously, in a relatively short period of time. A survey can collect information about customers, products, work practices and attitudes. A survey may also be referred to as a questionnaire.
Title: Re: Elicitation Techniques in Business Analysis
Post by: 1171921109 on January 21, 2018, 09:46:31 pm
Elicitation Techniques in Business Analysis
1: Prototyping -

Benefit: You can make sure that what you’re designing is really what people need while you still have time to change it.

2: Requirements Workshops –

Benefit: You can get your basic requirements done in a hurry. Also, everyone you invite can become invested in the project.

3:  Interviews –

Benefit: By exploring someone’s knowledge and needs in-depth, one-on-one, you ensure you understand the real, not just the perceived, need.

4: Brainstorming –

Benefit: You can avoid potential “gotchas” down the road by enlisting others to help you discover your unknowns. Also, more than most other methods, brainstorming enables you to take in a wide amount of information at once, helping you figure out where you want to go from here.

5: Observation -

Benefit: You can figure out exactly where users are at the start of your project, and you can use your strengths to document it.
Title: Re: Elicitation Techniques in Business Analysis
Post by: 1173025809 on January 22, 2018, 06:00:27 pm
An elicitation technique is any of a number of data collection techniques used in anthropology, cognitive science, counseling, education, knowledge engineering, linguistics, management, philosophy, psychology, or other fields to gather knowledge or information from people.

Typically the BA is dealing with a variety of input points (that is, IT, sales, and finance) where each has a different documentation and reporting structure, often along with a unique culture and language. Strong organizational and communication skills are required during this phase, as it is generally up to the BA to shape the information into models, diagrams, and other tools to communicate the findings to decision makers and to team members.

Enterprise opportunities, restrictions, assumptions, and current reality are all reflected by stakeholders during requirements elicitation. The BA must be able to resolve conflicts between requirements, eliminate the potential for conflicts (if possible), and achieve consensus among team members and stakeholders as requirements are defined and prioritised.
When considering elicitation activities, the BA must develop strategies for two primary functions: Preparing for Elicitation and Conducting Elicitation.

Requirements Elicitation Techniques -
-Brainstorming
-Document Analysis
-Focus Groups
-Interface Analysis
-Interviews
-Observation
-Prototyping
-Requirements Workshops
-Survey/Questionnaire
Title: Re: Elicitation Techniques in Business Analysis
Post by: 1172540411 on February 07, 2018, 05:16:20 pm
Requirements elicitation techniques

Numerous elicitation techniques can be used for software projects. A project team should not expect to use only one elicitation technique. There are always many types of information to be discovered, and different stakeholders will prefer different approaches.

They are two types of elicitation techniques, they are facilitated activities and independent elicitation techniques.

Facilitated activities :In which BA interacts with stakeholders to elicit requirements. The Facilitated activities primarily focus on discovering business and user requirements.

Independent activities: In which BA works on his own to discover information. The independent elicitation techniques supplement the requirements that users present and reveal needed functionality that end users might not be aware of. Most projects will use a combination of both facilitated and independent elicitation activities.

Interviews
The most obvious way to find out what the users of a software system need is to ask them. A BA will facilitate either a individual or small-group interviews to elicit requirements.
Interviews are appropriate for eliciting business requirements from executives who do not have a lot of time to meet.
Establish rapport  To begin an interview, A BA will introduce him self if the attendees don’t already know him, review the agenda, remind attendees of the session objectives, and address any preliminary questions or concerns attendees have.
Stay in scope  :keep the discussion focused on its objective. Even when talking with just one person or a small group, there’s a chance the interview will go off topic.
Prepare questions and straw man models ahead of time ,such as a list of questions to guide the conversation.
Suggest ideas  Rather than simply transcribing what customers say, a creative BA proposes ideas and alternatives during elicitation
Listen actively 

Workshops
Workshops encourage stakeholder collaboration in defining requirements
A requirements workshop is “a structured meeting in which a carefully selected group of stakeholders and content experts work together to define, create, refine, and reach closure on deliverables  that represent user requirements.”

Workshops are facilitated sessions with multiple stakeholders and formal roles, such as a facilitator and a scribe. Workshops often include several types of stakeholders, from users to developers to testers. They are used to elicit requirements from multiple stakeholders concurrently. Working in a group is more effective for resolving disagreements.

workshops are helpful when quick elicitation turnaround is needed because of schedule constraints.

The facilitator plays a critical role in planning the workshop, selecting  participants, and guiding them to a successful outcome.

A scribe assists the facilitator by capturing the points that come up during the discussion

Establish and enforce ground rules  The workshop participants should agree on some basic operating principles
Fill all of the team roles  A facilitator must make sure that the following tasks are covered by people in the workshop: note taking, time keeping, scope management, ground rule management, and making sure everyone is heard.

Plan an agenda Create the plan and workshop agenda ahead of time, and communicate them to participants so they know the objectives and what to expect and can prepare accordingly.

Stay in scope  Refer to the business requirements to confirm whether proposed user requirements lie within the current project scope

Timebox discussions  Consider allocating a fixed period of time to each discussion topic

Keep the team small but include the right stakeholders

Keep everyone engaged


Focus groups
A focus group is a representative group of users who convene in a facilitated elicitation activity to generate input and ideas on a product’s functional and quality requirements. Focus group sessions must be interactive, allowing all users a chance to voice their thoughts. Focus groups are useful for exploring users’ attitudes, impressions, preferences, and needs


Observations

When you ask users to describe how they do their jobs, they will likely have a hard time being precise. Often this is because tasks are complex and it’s hard to remember every minute detail. Or it is because users are so familiar with executing a task that they can’t articulate everything they do.
Observations are time consuming, so they aren’t suitable for every user or every task.
Observing a user’s workflow in the task environment allows the BA to validate information collected from other sources, to identify new topics for interviews, to see problems with the  current system, and to identify ways that the new system can better support the workflow.
Observations can be silent or interactive. Silent observations are appropriate when busy users cannot be interrupted. Interactive observations allow the BA to interrupt the user mid-task and ask a question. This is useful to understand immediately why a user made a choice or to ask him what he was thinking about when he took some action. Document what you observe for further analysis after the session.

Questionnaires
Questionnaires are a way to survey large groups of users to understand their needs. They are inexpensive, making them a logical choice for eliciting information from large user populations, and they can be administered easily across geographical boundaries.
Preparing well-written questions is the biggest challenge with questionnaires.

Brain storming
It can be done in groups or individually. The ideas collected must be reviewed and analyzed and if they are relevant should be included. It helps in coming with innovate requirements and generating many ideas. And later these ideas must be prioritized. 
1)   Prepare for brainstorming : Define the area, time limit, stakeholders to be included and the roles, criteria to rate the ideas.
2)   Conduct the session: Record all ideas, share ideas without criticism.
3)   Wrap-up the session: Evaluate the ideas, rate the ideas, communicate the finalized ideas.

Reverse Engineering:
Reverse engineering is used to elicit the requirements from the implemented software code, if this software system has outdated or little existing documentation.
Reverse engineering is of two types.
Black Box: The system is studied without examining its internal structure.
White box: The inner working of system is studied.

JOINT APPLICATION DEVELOPMENT
It is an extended facilitated workshop. It involves collaboration between internal and external stake holders to identify the requirements in a concentrated and focused effort.


PROTOTYPE

A software prototype is a partial, possible, or preliminary implementation of a proposed new product.
Prototypes can serve three major purposes,

Clarify, complete, and validate requirements: User evaluation of the prototype points out problems with requirements and uncovers overlooked requirements, which you can correct at low cost before you construct the actual product. This is especially helpful for parts of the system that are not well understood or are particularly risky or complex.

Explore design alternatives: They’re useful for confirming the developers understanding of the requirements before constructing actual solution.

Create a subset that will grow into the ultimate product.

The primary reason for creating a prototype is to resolve uncertainties early in the  development process. A prototype is useful for finding and solving ambiguity and incompleteness in the requirements.
 
Three classes of prototype
Scope : A mock-up prototype focuses on the user experience
Future use:  A throwaway prototype is discarded after it has been used to generate feedback, whereas an evolutionary prototype grows into the final product through a series of iterations
Form : A paper prototype is a simple sketch drawn on paper, a whiteboard


System interface analysis

Interface analysis is an independent elicitation technique that entails examining the systems to which your system connects. System interface analysis reveals functional requirements regarding the exchange of data and services between systems
For each system that interfaces with yours, identify functionality in the other system that might lead to requirements for your system.

User interface analysis
User interface (UI) analysis is an independent elicitation technique in which you study existing systems to discover user and functional requirements.

Document analysis
Document analysis means examining any existing documentation for potential software requirements. The most useful documentation includes requirements specifications, business processes, lessons-learned collections, and user manuals for existing or similar applications. Documents can describe corporate or industry standards that must be followed or regulations with which the product must comply. When replacing an existing system, past documentation can reveal functionality that might need to be retained, as well as obsolete functionality.
A risk with this technique is that the available documents might not be up to date. Requirements might have changed without the specifications being updated, or functionality might be documented that is not needed in a new system.


Title: Re: Elicitation Techniques in Business Analysis
Post by: 1172202407 on February 08, 2018, 11:25:16 am
Elicitation techniques as below 

1. Brainstorming
2. Document Analysis
3. Reverse Engineering
4. Focus Groups
5. Observation
6. Workshop
7. JAD Sessions
8. Interview
9. Prototyping
10. Questionnaire
Title: Re: Elicitation Techniques in Business Analysis
Post by: 1171948312 on February 13, 2018, 04:07:11 pm
Requirement Elicitation Technique:-

1.Workshop
2.JAD
3.Questionnaire- open closed
4.Survey
5.Document Analysis- (AS-IS)
6.Focus Group- Active/Inactive- Homogeneous/Heterogeneous
7.Brainstorming
8.Interface Analysis-(i/p,o/p)
9.Prototyping
Title: Re: Elicitation Techniques in Business Analysis
Post by: 1170944412 on March 10, 2018, 01:08:24 pm
Requirement elicitation is the process of obtaining information from the stakeholders and it is the crux of requirement documentation. The different techniques used are-
o   Brainstorming
o   Document analysis
o   Reverse engineering
o   Interviews
o   Focus groups
o   Workshops
o   JAD workshops
o   Observation
o   Prototyping
o   Questionnaire
Title: Re: Elicitation Techniques in Business Analysis
Post by: 1170831310 on March 13, 2018, 11:02:57 pm
Elicitation involves the actions that are taken to understand the users and discover their needs. 

Elicitation includes the discovery and some invention, as well as recording those bits of requirements information that customer representatives and subject matter experts (users) offer to the analyst. 

Below are few techniques used by BA,
1. Brainstorming
2. Document Analysis
3. Focus Group
4. Interface Analysis
5. Interview
6. Observation
7. Prototyping
8. Requirements Workshop
9. Reverse Engineering
10. Survey / Questionnaire
Title: Re: Elicitation Techniques in Business Analysis
Post by: 1180356502 on March 21, 2018, 09:53:53 pm
these all are mainly used techniques by BA
1. Brainstorming
2. Document Analysis
3. Focus Groups
4. Interface Analysis
5. Interviews
6. Observation
7.Prototyping
8.Requirements Workshops
9. Survey/Questionnaire
Title: Re: Elicitation Techniques in Business Analysis
Post by: 1180650901 on March 26, 2018, 12:00:33 pm
Elicitation Techniques : help to get more information with the clear understanding
Such technique's Are:
Brainstorming
*Document Analysis
*Focus Groups
*Interface Analysis
*Interviews
*Observation
*Prototyping
*Requirements Workshops
*Survey/Questionnaire
Title: Re: Elicitation Techniques in Business Analysis
Post by: 1172831810 on April 07, 2018, 01:47:49 pm
In the business environment, it is required to have an effective way of market research to understand what a customer wants and how to be successful over competitors. We need to focus on how to make the users to achieve their goals. The Requirements gathering process will help in understanding the needs of a customer, especially in the IT industry.

There are several different requirement gathering techniques that can be used. Several tools and techniques are used by the stakeholders and business analyst to facilitate this process and capture the exact and detailed requirements. The Requirements gathering techniques should help in breaking down Requirements and Gathering into digestible steps thereby providing instructions to complete each step.

Let us take a look at some of the requirements gathering techniques. Some commonly used methods include:


1. Interviews

Interviews are of primary ways for information gathering where the system analyst will  have face-to-face interaction with relevant stakeholders or subject matter experts. The business analyst will spend most of the time to interview system users and system owner during the early stages of project life cycle.

It is important to be very clearly articulate of the objectives of interviews and the questions could be prepared ahead of time or asked spontaneously and the responses should be recorded. Interviews could also be done with multiple interviewers and / or multiple interviewers.  Interviews could be either one on one or group interviews.

Types of Interviews
There are two types of interviews namely unstructured interviews and structured interviews.

UNSTRUCTURED INTERVIEWS
These involve a conversation by the interviewee asking general questions. It is usually inefficient technique as it has a tendency to go off track from the main goal and the analyst will have to redirect the interview in the right path.

STRUCTURED INTERVIEWS
The interviewer will be the one making specific questions in order to obtain the required information from the interviewee. This type of interview is considered to be efficient.

SEMI-STRUCTURED INTERVIEWS
It begins with focused questions and moves to open-ended discussion.  The data of interest will have to be predetermined.  Some of the questions that need to be asked are mentioned below.

How should a task be performed?
Why is this task being performed?
Under what conditions, this task should be performed?
What information do you need to complete the task
Whom should the communication be sent to?


2. Questionnaires

It is an informal technique in which a document is used to collect   information and opinion from respondents. It allows the system analyst to collect information from a target population which is very large and in remote locations or those who will have only minor input into the overall requirements. The responses could be sent for further statistical analysis if needed. It makes clear and specific questions and involves some closed questions with a range of answers.

Format for Questionnaires
FREE FORMAT
Free format questionnaires will allow users to answer freely for each question. A question is asked and the respondent records the answer in the space provided after the question. An example of free format questions is “Are there any problems with the current functionality? If yes, please explain”

FIXED FORMAT
Fixed-format questionnaires contains questions that require a selection of predefined responses from individuals. Respondents need to select an answer from a set of answers given. An answer from this format is much easier to analyze. But, on the other hand, it is more static; respondents cannot give their opinion or answers other than provided.


3. Observations
Observation or job shadowing involves an analyst watching their client performing their daily tasks and asking questions about what they are doing and why. It is a great way to understand what the user might go through in their job and can provide some immediate requirements for how a process can be improved.

Types of Observation
PASSIVE/INVISIBLE
Here the analyst does not interact with the worker at all while the observation is going on, but takes notes. The analyst can ask questions by using a prepared list of questions of the worker on completion of the entire process, but they are not to interrupt the person while they work. Some jobs are too hectic or dangerous for the worker to be constantly stopped and questioned. In those cases passive observation works the best.

ACTIVE/VISIBLE
Here the analyst can interrupt the worker to ask questions during the observation session. Some questions to ask include:

“Why are you doing this at this point?”
“What is usually the next step?”


4. Facilitated Workshops

Facilitated Workshops bring a larger group on a common platform to discuss and reach agreements. They help to define cross-functional requirements for a product in a faster manner than if you were to interview each of them separately. A successful facilitated session requires planning. The facilitator will need to consider a common meeting location, the session duration, how consensus will be achieved and the agenda.


5.Focus Groups

Focus groups involve synergistic discussion among people who are representative of the users or customers related to the expectations, features and other aspects of a product. A feedback will be collected about needs / opportunities / problems to identify requirements.

The discussion is facilitated by a trained moderator. The participants will be selected and their roles, topics to be discussed and logistics will be prepared for the focus group and a group report records about what was learned will be made.


6. Joint Application development (JAD)

It is a technique where a workshop is facilitated and the entire system participants sit and discuss for the system analysis and defining requirements. The discussion continues until the session objectives are completed and complete set of requirements is documented and agreed to.

It has been used to obtain and gather information from the group about the problems, objectives and system requirements. During the session, they sit together to discuss and get the ideas from the participants.


7. Brainstorming

It involves self-generated contribution of ideas by the group members around a specific issue, problem or requirement. The appropriate subject matter experts will start creatively brainstorming about what the solution might look like. The ideas gathered from the group members will be prioritized depending on the ones they think are the best for this solution. The resulting consensus of best ideas is used for the initial requirements.

The objective of brainstorming in a group is to reduce social suppression among group members and stimulate fresh ideas generation leading to an increase the overall creativity of the group.


8.Prototyping

In this approach, the preliminary requirements will be gathered which is used to build an initial version of the solution called a prototype. The prototype may not have all the functionality but serves as a proof of concept for idea verification/further analysis. An iterative process of prototype creation, testing and feedback is followed before reaching a final stage.

This repetitive process continues until the product meets the final goal of business for an agreed number of iterations.


9.Documentation Analysis

The technique involves written documentation of procedures and tasks that often exist, particularly in business contexts. It describes how things should be done rather than how they are. This also helps the Business Analyst to prepare questions for validating the requirement correctness and completeness. Most of the information is mostly buried in present documents that assist us in putting questions as a part of validating the requirement completeness.

The core of system analysis is to get as much as information needed to develop the system. Hence it is in our hands in deciding which techniques will best do the job in the time and with the resources available. During the requirement gathering, the analyst will identify what types of techniques will be used and what type of information will collected.
Title: Re: Elicitation Techniques in Business Analysis
Post by: Satish kumar Gajula on April 25, 2018, 09:27:21 pm
Elicitation Techniques in Business Analysis are as follows:
   Brainstorming
   Document Analysis
   Reverse Engineering
   Focus Groups
   Observation
   Workshop
   JAD (Joint Application Development) – Requirements Workshop
   Interview
   Prototyping
   Questionnaire (Survey)
Title: Re: Elicitation Techniques in Business Analysis
Post by: 1182057301 on May 19, 2018, 08:39:28 am
Elicitation Techniques in Business Analysis:
1. Stakeholder Analysis: Stakeholder Analysis identifies all the users and stakeholders who may influence or be impacted by the system. This helps to ensure that needs of all those involved are taken into account
2. Brainstorming: It is utilized in the requirement elicitation to gather good number of ideas from a group of people. Usually brainstorming is used in identifying all he possible solutions to problems and simplifies the detail of opportunities.
3.Interviews:It is most important technique for gathering requirements is to sit down with the clients and ask them what they need .
4.Document Analysis: Document Analysis is an important technique in which present system is evaluated through documents and assist in AS-IS process documents and also driving the gap analysis .
5.Focus Groups: A Focus group is actually gathering of people who are customers or users representatives for a  product to gain its feedback. The feedback can be collected about opportunities, needs and problems to determine requirements or it can be collected to refine and validate the already elicited requirements.
6.Interface Analysis: It is a process of analyzing the touch points with another system and is vital to ensure that requirements are not overlooked that are not instantly visible to the users.
7.Observations: It is method of collecting requirements by observing the people doing their normal work.This method is generally used to find the additional requirements needed by the user,when user is unable to explain their expected requirements from the new product and problem in their existing product.
8.Prototyping:In this approach preliminary requirements are gathered to build the initial version of the solution and then ask client to provides the additional requirements for the application.This repetitive process continues until the product meets the critical mass of business needs or for an agreed number of iterations.
9.JAD(Joint Application development): This technique is most efficient for gathering requirements. The requirements workshops are more organized and structured where all the parties get together to document requirements.
10.Questionnaire: These are much more informal and they are good tools to gather requirements from stakeholders in remote locations or those who will have minor input to overall requirements .
11. Surveys: This technique is used when requirement gathering needs to be done from many people and interviews needs to be conducted with less time and less budget. In this techniques users are insisted on choose from the given options agree/disagree or rate something for requirements.
Title: Re: Elicitation Techniques in Business Analysis
Post by: 1180364703 on May 29, 2018, 01:09:01 pm
Here I will explain couple of Elicitation Techniques.

A Business Analayst's job is to draw out the requirements from the Business Users and communicating the same to Developers and Testers.
Thus, there are several methods in which a BA will communicate to these Business Users. These methods are called Requirement Elicitation Techniques.
Below are the Requirement Elicitation Techniques:
1. Brainstorming
2. Document Analysis
3. Workshop
4. Observation
5. Reverse Engineering
6. JAD (Joint Application Development)
7. Interview
8. Questionnaire
9. Prototyping

A Brainstorming session is organized where multiple Business Users (6 to 8) come along with the creative ideas and thus, making it easy for BA to draw out
the requirements.

Observation are of 2 types:
1. Active Observation
2. Passive Observation

In Active Observation, the BA actively participates in the discussion with Business Users to elicit the requirements
In Passive Observation, the BA acts as a Spectator during the discussion happening among the Business Users. If a BA feels that the discussion is going
out of track, the BA pitches in and makes sure that the discussion continues related to the Product being discussed.

One of the effective methods to draw out accurate requirements is JAD sessions where other stakeholders such as Developers and testers may participate along with
the BAs and the Business Users.

In case the Business Users are not readily available for the discussion on requirements, a Questionnaire is sent to the users and the Business Users has
to make sure that the queries in Questionnaire are addressed within specified time range.

To make sure that the requirements are understood well by the BA, the BA prepares a prototype of the given product and the same is provided to stakeholders to give
a clear picture on the look and feel of the product.

After elicitating all possible requirements from the Business Users, the BA prepares the Functional Requirements specification document which contains the
detailed explanation of the requirements. The same is sent to Business Users for approval.
A meeting is then scheduled with the Developers to communicate the requirements so that the same can be implemented. During the product development phase,
the requirements are communicated to Testers and the required walkthrough sessions are scheduled where BA communicates with Testing team and make them understand
the requirements well.
Title: Re: Elicitation Techniques in Business Analysis
Post by: 1172539811 on June 03, 2018, 07:48:37 pm
Elicitation techniques that can be used by a BA are mentioned below:

-Brainstorming
-Document Analysis
-Focus Groups
-Interface Analysis
-Interviews
-Observation
-Prototyping
-Requirements Workshops
-Survey/Questionnaire
Title: Re: Elicitation Techniques in Business Analysis
Post by: 1183170103 on June 15, 2018, 03:01:05 pm
Pretty much what everyone mentioned before, depending on the situation, you can employ any of these,
Interviews, surveys, questionnaires, workshops, document analysis, focus groups, reverse engineering, brainstorming and many more situational techniques
Title: Re: Elicitation Techniques in Business Analysis
Post by: 1180364903 on June 22, 2018, 07:53:21 pm
Below are the requirement elicitation technique

Brainstorming.
Document Analysis.
Focus Groups.
Interface Analysis.
Interviews.
Observation.
Prototyping.
Requirements Workshops
Title: Re: Elicitation Techniques in Business Analysis
Post by: 1181472704 on June 25, 2018, 08:11:00 am
Brainstorming
Document Analysis
Focus Groups
Interface Analysis
Interviews
Observation
Prototyping
Requirements Workshops
Survey/Questionnaire
Title: Re: Elicitation Techniques in Business Analysis
Post by: 1181471104 on June 27, 2018, 11:30:01 am
Various elicitation techniques provided by business analyst are:

*Brainstorming
*Document Analysis
*Focus Groups
*Interface Analysis
*Interviews
*Observation
*Prototyping
*Requirements Workshops
*Survey/Questionnaire
Title: Re: Elicitation Techniques in Business Analysis
Post by: 1181278305 on July 11, 2018, 10:22:38 pm
Elicitation Techniques Used By Business Analysts (BABOK 3.2)
In: Discover all the Requirements By: Laura Brandenburg
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Elicitation is one of those areas that is both extremely simple and extremely complex. In the BABOK 2.0, the purpose of Conduct Elicitation Activity (outlined in section 5.2) is:

 Meet with stakeholders to elicit information regarding their needs.

Simple, right? But within this short task, the detail is in the techniques, and that’s where it can start to seem complex.

The BABOK Identifies 9 Elicitation Techniques
Here are the 9 elicitation techniques defined by the BABOK for business analysts:

Brainstorming
Document Analysis
Focus Groups
Interface Analysis
Interviews
Observation
Prototyping
Requirements Workshops
Survey/Questionnaire

Most BA uses combination of elicitation techniques .
Title: Re: Elicitation Techniques in Business Analysis
Post by: 1182459701 on September 28, 2018, 02:24:33 am
Elicitation techniques in bussiness analysis are:
Brainstorming
Requirements workshop
document analysis
Reverse engineering
focus group
interface analysis
observation
workshop
prototyping

Title: Re: Elicitation Techniques in Business Analysis
Post by: 1182916109 on December 14, 2018, 01:47:49 pm
There are 9 elicitation techniques for business analysts:
1. Brainstorming
2. Document Analysis
3. Focus Groups
4. Interface Analysis
5. Interviews
6. Observation
7. Prototyping
8. Requirements Workshops
9. Survey/Questionnaire
Title: Re: Elicitation Techniques in Business Analysis
Post by: Siluvai Michael Raja on January 29, 2019, 08:21:18 am
Brainstorming – The purpose of gathering your stakeholders for brainstorming is “to produce numerous new ideas, and to derive from them themes for further analysis.

Document analysis – Document analysis involves gathering and reviewing all existing documentation that is pertinent to your business objective or that may hold data related to a relevant solution.

Focus Group – Focus groups consist of a mix of pre-qualified stakeholders who gather to offer input on the business need at hand and its potential solutions.

Interface Analysis – An interface analysis carefully analyses and deconstructs the way that a user interacts with an application, or the way one application interacts with another.

Interviews – One-on-one interviews are among the most popular types of requirements elicitation, and for good reason: they give an analyst the opportunity to discuss in-depth a stakeholder’s thoughts and get his or her perspective on the business need and the feasibility of potential solutions.

Observation (job shadowing) – Observation is quite helpful when considering a project that will change or enhance current processes.

Prototyping (storyboarding, navigation flow, paper prototyping, screen flows) – Prototyping is especially valuable for stakeholders such as business owners and end users who may not understand all of the technical aspects of requirements, but will better relate to a visual representation of the end product.

Requirements workshops – A requirements workshop involves gathering a previously identified stakeholders in a structured setting for a defined amount of time in order to elicit, refine, and/or edit requirements.

Survey/questionnaire
– While they preclude the opportunity for in-person, ad hoc conversations, surveys are useful for quickly gathering data from a large group of participants.
Title: Re: Elicitation Techniques in Business Analysis
Post by: 1171835509 on April 03, 2019, 04:46:02 pm
Please explain interface analysis in brief?
Title: Re: Elicitation Techniques in Business Analysis
Post by: 1191648502 on May 12, 2019, 07:01:13 pm
Various elicitation techniques provided by business analyst are:

1)Brainstorming
2)Document Analysis
3)Focus Groups
4)Interface Analysis
5)Interviews
6)Observation
7)Prototyping
8)Requirements Workshops
9)Survey/Questionnaire
Title: Re: Elicitation Techniques in Business Analysis
Post by: 1191648702 on May 25, 2019, 07:26:29 pm
Various elicitation techniques
*Brainstorming
*Document Analysis
*Focus Groups
*Interviews
*Observation
*Prototyping
*Workshops
*Survey/Questionnaire
*Reverse engineering
*JAD(Joint application development)
Title: Re: Elicitation Techniques in Business Analysis
Post by: 1192574505 on July 26, 2019, 06:07:14 pm
    Reengineering
    Document Analysis
    Focus Groups
    Interface Analysis
    Interviews
    Observation
    Prototyping
    Requirements Workshops
    Survey/Questionnaire
   Brainstorming
Title: Re: Elicitation Techniques in Business Analysis
Post by: 1192767805 on August 03, 2019, 10:09:23 am
    Brainstorming
    JAD session
    Document Analysis
    Focus Groups
    Interface Analysis
    Interviews
    Observation
    Prototyping
    Requirements Workshops
    Survey/Questionnaire
Title: Re: Elicitation Techniques in Business Analysis
Post by: 1192767805 on August 03, 2019, 10:31:47 am
what is the first step of requirement elication?
Title: Re: Elicitation Techniques in Business Analysis
Post by: 1190879106 on August 03, 2019, 07:10:46 pm
Elicitation is the process of collecting requirements from various stakeholders.
Types of elicitation techniques include:

*Brainstorming
*Document Analysis
*Reverse Engineering
*Focus Groups
*Observation
*Prototyping
*Joint Application Development (JAD) sessions
*Requirements Workshops
*Survey/Questionnaire
Title: Re: Elicitation Techniques in Business Analysis
Post by: 1190244102 on August 03, 2019, 07:41:49 pm
Different elicitation techniques are:

*Brainstorming
*Document Analysis
*Requirements Workshops
*Survey/Questionnaire
*Focus Groups
*Interface Analysis
*Interviews
*Observation
*Prototyping
Title: Re: Elicitation Techniques in Business Analysis
Post by: 1190686707 on December 14, 2019, 12:04:38 pm
Brainstorming
Document Analysis
Focus Groups
Interface Analysis
Interviews
Observation
Prototyping
Requirements Workshops
Survey/Questionnaire
Many new BAs feel they should be using all of the techniques and are worried they aren’t getting elicitation right. Or, they think about their experience in this area and it seems that most of the time they get information about stakeholder needs through casual conversations and reviews, so their experience with elicitation seems a bit informal.

This is an area of business analysis that it’s very common for professionals to have relevant experience in. It’s also an area where even the most senior BAs never stop improving.
Title: Re: Elicitation Techniques in Business Analysis
Post by: 1190952511 on December 15, 2019, 03:38:07 am
Elicitation Techniques -

Brainstorming
Document Analysis
Reserve Engineering
Observation
Workshop
Joint Application Development
Interview
Questionnaire/Servey
Title: Re: Elicitation Techniques in Business Analysis
Post by: 1190953311 on December 16, 2019, 06:58:20 pm
1. what are the requirement elicitation techniques?

2. when requirements questions?
Title: Re: Elicitation Techniques in Business Analysis
Post by: 1192357311 on December 17, 2019, 05:30:19 pm
Various elicitation techniques used by the business analyst are:

1. Brainstorming
2. Document Analysis
3. Focus Groups
4. Interface Analysis
5. Interviews
6. Observation
7. Prototyping
8. Requirements Workshops
9. Survey/Questionnaire[/li][/list]
Title: Re: Elicitation Techniques in Business Analysis
Post by: 1191214910 on December 29, 2019, 07:43:02 pm
Elicitation techniques is to give the perfect,exact and correct proper solutions.
They are some elicitation techniques used by business Analyst as follows
1. Brainstorming
2. Document Analysis
3. Focus Groups
4. Interface Analysis
5. Interviews
6. Observation
7. Prototyping
8. Requirements Workshops
Title: Re: Elicitation Techniques in Business Analysis
Post by: 1200182002 on April 11, 2020, 01:46:37 pm
Different types of Elicitation Techniques are

1. Brainstorming
Prepare for Brainstorming
Conduct Brainstorming
Wrap-up Brainstorming

2. Document Analysis
Prepare for document analysis
Analyze the documents
Post Document Analysts wrap-up

3. Reverse Engineering
Black Box Reverse Engineering
White Box Reverse Engineering

4. Observation
Passive/invisible
Active/Visible

5. Workshop

6. Joint Application Development (JAD)

7. Interview

8. Prototyping

9. Questionnaire

10. MoScoW



Title: Re: Elicitation Techniques in Business Analysis
Post by: 1202988702 on May 05, 2020, 03:49:47 pm
Different Types Of Elicitation Technique are :
Brainstorming : Brainstorming can be done individually or in a group. Users or stakeholders can come up with ideas or requirements that they have seen or experienced. These ideas can be reviewed and the relevant ones can then be included in the system requirements.

Document analysis : This is helpful in understanding the current process & can provide the inputs for the new system requirements.
Documents like user manuals, software vendor manuals, BRD, Features Documents, Functionality documents.

Reverse engineering : If an existing system has outdated documentation, it can be reverse engineered to understand what the system does. This is an elicitation technique that can extract implemented requirements from the system. There are two types of reverse engineering techniques.
   Black box reverse engineering: The system is studied without examining its internal structure    (function and composition of software).
   White box reverse engineering: The inner workings of the system are studied (analyzing and    understanding of software code).

Focus Group : A focus group are basically the End Users, these are the people who would be using the system in future upon project completion. The focus group is a means to elicit ideas & attitudes about a specific product, service or opportunity in an interactive group environment. The participants share their impressions, preferences & needs, guided by a moderator. There are 2 types of focus groups
Homogeneous: Based on similar characteristics. 
Heterogeneous: Different background people.
Observation : This elicitation technique helps in collecting requirements by observing users or stakeholders. This can provide information about the exiting process, inputs and outputs. There are two kinds of observations — active and passive.
In active (Visible) observation, the business analyst directly observes the users or stakeholders,
In passive (Invisible) observation, the business analyst observes the subject matter experts.
Workshop : Workshops comprise a group of users or stakeholders 6 or more in numbers working together to identify requirements. Workshops are used to scope, discover, define, and prioritize requirements for the proposed system. These are usually conducted by the client.
They are the most effective way to deliver high-quality requirements quickly. Workshops tend to be of a defined duration, rather than outcome & may need to be briefly repeated in order to clarify or obtain further details.
JAD (Joint Application Development) : Joint Application Development (JAD) technique is an extended session to the workshop. In the JAD session stakeholders and project team works together to identify the requirements. These sessions allow the business team to gather and consolidate large amounts of information. The JAD team includes business process owners, client representatives, users or stakeholders, business analysts, project managers, IT experts (developers, quality assurance, designers, and security).
Interview : An interview is a systematic approach to elicit information from a person or group of people in an informal or formal setting by talking to the person. In this case, the business analyst acts as an interviewer. An interview provides an opportunity to explore and/or clarify requirements in more detail. Without knowing the expectations and goals of the stakeholders it is difficult to fulfil requirements.
Prototyping : Screen mockups can support the requirement gathering process, when introduced at the correct time. Mockups help stakeholders visualize the functionality of a system. This can be an advantage to business analysts and stakeholders since this allows them to identify gaps/problems early.
Surveys/Questionnaires : Questionnaires are useful when there is a lot of information to be gathered from a larger group of stakeholders. This enables the business team to gather requirements from stakeholders remotely. The design of the questionnaire is very important, since it can influence the answers that people provide.
Title: Re: Elicitation Techniques in Business Analysis
Post by: 1200473701 on May 11, 2020, 10:50:36 am
Here are the 9 elicitation techniques defined by the BABOK for business analysts:

Brainstorming
Document Analysis
Focus Groups
Interface Analysis
Interviews
Observation
Prototyping
Requirements Workshops
Survey/Questionnaire
Title: Re: Elicitation Techniques in Business Analysis
Post by: 1190952411 on May 15, 2020, 05:24:37 pm
Elicitation refers to requirement gathering.

There are various elicitation techniques which are used by business analyst to gather information they are;
1. Document analysis
2. Self Observation
3. Brainstorming
4. Requirement workshops
5. Interface Analysis
6. Focus Groups
7. Interviews
8. Prototyping
9. Survey/Questionnaire
 
Title: Re: Elicitation Techniques in Business Analysis
Post by: 1202894803 on June 04, 2020, 11:20:28 pm
Elicitation Techniques in Business Analysis:
?Brainstorming
?Document Analysis
?Focus Groups
?Interface Analysis
?Interviews
?Observation
?Prototyping
?Requirements Workshops
?Survey/Questionnaire
Title: Re: Elicitation Techniques in Business Analysis
Post by: 1192091407 on June 05, 2020, 06:11:17 pm
what are the mostly used elicitation techniques used practically in a company?
Title: Re: Elicitation Techniques in Business Analysis
Post by: 1202988602 on June 06, 2020, 12:58:36 am
Requirements Elicitation is the process of digging out the information from the stakeholders.
The different types of elicitation techniques are as follows:
Brainstorming
Documentation analysis
Reverse Engineering
Observation
Focus Groups
workshop
JAD(Joint Application Development)
Interview
Prototyping
Questionnaire
Title: Re: Elicitation Techniques in Business Analysis
Post by: 1192168612 on July 31, 2020, 05:09:49 pm
Elicitation techniques are commonly used by BA and it is regularly followed.
There are some elicitation techniques defined by BABOK for business analysts:
1. Brainstorming.
2. Document Analysis.
3. Focus Groups.
4. Interface Analysis.
5. Interviews.
6. Observation.
7. Prototyping.
8. Requirements Workshops