Author Topic: Elicitation Techniques in Business Analysis  (Read 8609 times)

1190953311

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Re: Elicitation Techniques in Business Analysis
« Reply #45 on: December 16, 2019, 06:58:20 pm »
1. what are the requirement elicitation techniques?

2. when requirements questions?

1192357311

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Re: Elicitation Techniques in Business Analysis
« Reply #46 on: December 17, 2019, 05:30:19 pm »
Various elicitation techniques used by the business analyst are:

1. Brainstorming
2. Document Analysis
3. Focus Groups
4. Interface Analysis
5. Interviews
6. Observation
7. Prototyping
8. Requirements Workshops
9. Survey/Questionnaire[/li][/list]

1191214910

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Re: Elicitation Techniques in Business Analysis
« Reply #47 on: December 29, 2019, 07:43:02 pm »
Elicitation techniques is to give the perfect,exact and correct proper solutions.
They are some elicitation techniques used by business Analyst as follows
1. Brainstorming
2. Document Analysis
3. Focus Groups
4. Interface Analysis
5. Interviews
6. Observation
7. Prototyping
8. Requirements Workshops

1200182002

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Re: Elicitation Techniques in Business Analysis
« Reply #48 on: April 11, 2020, 01:46:37 pm »
Different types of Elicitation Techniques are

1. Brainstorming
Prepare for Brainstorming
Conduct Brainstorming
Wrap-up Brainstorming

2. Document Analysis
Prepare for document analysis
Analyze the documents
Post Document Analysts wrap-up

3. Reverse Engineering
Black Box Reverse Engineering
White Box Reverse Engineering

4. Observation
Passive/invisible
Active/Visible

5. Workshop

6. Joint Application Development (JAD)

7. Interview

8. Prototyping

9. Questionnaire

10. MoScoW




1202988702

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Re: Elicitation Techniques in Business Analysis
« Reply #49 on: May 05, 2020, 03:49:47 pm »
Different Types Of Elicitation Technique are :
Brainstorming : Brainstorming can be done individually or in a group. Users or stakeholders can come up with ideas or requirements that they have seen or experienced. These ideas can be reviewed and the relevant ones can then be included in the system requirements.

Document analysis : This is helpful in understanding the current process & can provide the inputs for the new system requirements.
Documents like user manuals, software vendor manuals, BRD, Features Documents, Functionality documents.

Reverse engineering : If an existing system has outdated documentation, it can be reverse engineered to understand what the system does. This is an elicitation technique that can extract implemented requirements from the system. There are two types of reverse engineering techniques.
   Black box reverse engineering: The system is studied without examining its internal structure    (function and composition of software).
   White box reverse engineering: The inner workings of the system are studied (analyzing and    understanding of software code).

Focus Group : A focus group are basically the End Users, these are the people who would be using the system in future upon project completion. The focus group is a means to elicit ideas & attitudes about a specific product, service or opportunity in an interactive group environment. The participants share their impressions, preferences & needs, guided by a moderator. There are 2 types of focus groups
Homogeneous: Based on similar characteristics. 
Heterogeneous: Different background people.
Observation : This elicitation technique helps in collecting requirements by observing users or stakeholders. This can provide information about the exiting process, inputs and outputs. There are two kinds of observations — active and passive.
In active (Visible) observation, the business analyst directly observes the users or stakeholders,
In passive (Invisible) observation, the business analyst observes the subject matter experts.
Workshop : Workshops comprise a group of users or stakeholders 6 or more in numbers working together to identify requirements. Workshops are used to scope, discover, define, and prioritize requirements for the proposed system. These are usually conducted by the client.
They are the most effective way to deliver high-quality requirements quickly. Workshops tend to be of a defined duration, rather than outcome & may need to be briefly repeated in order to clarify or obtain further details.
JAD (Joint Application Development) : Joint Application Development (JAD) technique is an extended session to the workshop. In the JAD session stakeholders and project team works together to identify the requirements. These sessions allow the business team to gather and consolidate large amounts of information. The JAD team includes business process owners, client representatives, users or stakeholders, business analysts, project managers, IT experts (developers, quality assurance, designers, and security).
Interview : An interview is a systematic approach to elicit information from a person or group of people in an informal or formal setting by talking to the person. In this case, the business analyst acts as an interviewer. An interview provides an opportunity to explore and/or clarify requirements in more detail. Without knowing the expectations and goals of the stakeholders it is difficult to fulfil requirements.
Prototyping : Screen mockups can support the requirement gathering process, when introduced at the correct time. Mockups help stakeholders visualize the functionality of a system. This can be an advantage to business analysts and stakeholders since this allows them to identify gaps/problems early.
Surveys/Questionnaires : Questionnaires are useful when there is a lot of information to be gathered from a larger group of stakeholders. This enables the business team to gather requirements from stakeholders remotely. The design of the questionnaire is very important, since it can influence the answers that people provide.

1200473701

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Re: Elicitation Techniques in Business Analysis
« Reply #50 on: May 11, 2020, 10:50:36 am »
Here are the 9 elicitation techniques defined by the BABOK for business analysts:

Brainstorming
Document Analysis
Focus Groups
Interface Analysis
Interviews
Observation
Prototyping
Requirements Workshops
Survey/Questionnaire

1190952411

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Re: Elicitation Techniques in Business Analysis
« Reply #51 on: May 15, 2020, 05:24:37 pm »
Elicitation refers to requirement gathering.

There are various elicitation techniques which are used by business analyst to gather information they are;
1. Document analysis
2. Self Observation
3. Brainstorming
4. Requirement workshops
5. Interface Analysis
6. Focus Groups
7. Interviews
8. Prototyping
9. Survey/Questionnaire
 

1202894803

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Re: Elicitation Techniques in Business Analysis
« Reply #52 on: June 04, 2020, 11:20:28 pm »
Elicitation Techniques in Business Analysis:
?Brainstorming
?Document Analysis
?Focus Groups
?Interface Analysis
?Interviews
?Observation
?Prototyping
?Requirements Workshops
?Survey/Questionnaire

1192091407

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Re: Elicitation Techniques in Business Analysis
« Reply #53 on: June 05, 2020, 06:11:17 pm »
what are the mostly used elicitation techniques used practically in a company?

1202988602

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Re: Elicitation Techniques in Business Analysis
« Reply #54 on: June 06, 2020, 12:58:36 am »
Requirements Elicitation is the process of digging out the information from the stakeholders.
The different types of elicitation techniques are as follows:
Brainstorming
Documentation analysis
Reverse Engineering
Observation
Focus Groups
workshop
JAD(Joint Application Development)
Interview
Prototyping
Questionnaire

1192168612

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Re: Elicitation Techniques in Business Analysis
« Reply #55 on: July 31, 2020, 05:09:49 pm »
Elicitation techniques are commonly used by BA and it is regularly followed.
There are some elicitation techniques defined by BABOK for business analysts:
1. Brainstorming.
2. Document Analysis.
3. Focus Groups.
4. Interface Analysis.
5. Interviews.
6. Observation.
7. Prototyping.
8. Requirements Workshops

1200601205

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Re: Elicitation Techniques in Business Analysis
« Reply #56 on: August 17, 2020, 12:13:31 pm »
BA Gathers the Requirements using the Elicitation techniques like:
 1. Brainstorming- can be done individually or in groups. Ideas are collected from the stakeholders/users.
 2. Documentation - Study the material and identify relevant business details. Ex: Reading of emails MoM Reading of RFP, RFI, etc
 3. Reverse engineering- engineering is an elicitation technique that can extract implemented requirements from the software code. Ex: Blackbox, Whitebox reverse engineering.
 4. Focus groups - In future these are the users/groups that going to use the system that we deliver. So, concentrate on how they are doing their work at present --- simplify the work. Homogeneous: Accountancy application. Heterogeneous: College system
 5. Observation- Passive & Active observations by BA.
 6. Workshops - Workshops can comprise 6-10 or more users / stakeholders, working together to identify requirements.
 7. JAD/Joint Application Development- It involves collaboration between stakeholders and system Analysts together to identify requirements in a focused effort, resulting in large quantity of high quality information in short period of time.
 8. Interview - An interview is a systematic approach to elicit information from users/stakeholders , where the interviewee/BA asks relevant questions and documenting the responses.
 9. Prototyping- Prototypes/ Mockups  of the system yet to be developed,  prepared by BA help the business representatives or clients visualize the functionality of the system. This can be a big advantage to help analysts and stakeholders identify problems early on. 
10. Questionnaire / Survey- Questionnaires can be prepared by BA and sent to many hundreds of users at a low cost. Good for getting input from users who are a long distance away. Receive written replies which can be easier to work with and analyze, and save time typing.

1200111407

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Re: Elicitation Techniques in Business Analysis
« Reply #57 on: September 16, 2020, 02:18:29 pm »
Elicitation techniques are used to get most of the information about requirements from stakeholders, subject matter experts (SME).
These are proactive in nature as against requirements gathering. Elicitation is a technique which span across all the stages of project lifecycle.
Some techniques are-
1. Brainstorming (Brainstorming works by focusing on a topic or problem, and then coming up with many radical solutions to it. This technique is best applied in a group as it draws on the experience and creativity of all members of the group)

2. Document analysis (Document analysis is a means to elicit requirements of an existing system by studying available documentation and identifying relevant information. Document analysis is used if the objective is to gather details of the "As Is" environment such as existing business rules)

3. Focus groups (A focus group is composed of pre-qualified individuals whose purpose is to discuss and comment on a topic. This is an opportunity for individuals to share their own perspectives and discuss them in a group setting.)

4. Interface analysis (Interface analysis helps to clarify the boundaries of the system. It distinguishes which system provides specific functionality along with the input and output data needs.)

5. Interview (An interview is a systematic approach to elicit information from a person or group of people in an informal or formal setting by talking to the person. In an interview, a business analyst formally or informally directs his/her questions to: a stakeholder / a subject-matter-expert / a potential user to obtain answers that finally take the shape of requirements)

6. Observation (Observation is a means to elicit requirements by conducting an assessment of the subject matter expert's work environment.)

7. Prototyping (aims to uncover and visualize interface requirements before the application is designed or developed)

8. Survey / Questionnaire (A survey is a means of eliciting information from many people, anonymously, in a relatively short time. A survey can collect information about customers, products, work practices and attitudes. A survey is often referred to as a questionnaire.)

1202908006

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Re: Elicitation Techniques in Business Analysis
« Reply #58 on: September 18, 2020, 09:17:13 pm »
Elicitation Techniques:

Elicitation is the process of collecting information from stakeholders.
 It serves as a foundation in documenting the requirements for application development.
There are a number of elicitation techniques to gather requirements or to collect the information from the stakeholders.
They are as follows:

1.   Document analysis
2.   Observation
3.   Interview
4.   Prototyping
5.   Brainstorming
6.   Workshop
7.   JAD (Joint Application Development)
8.   Reverse engineering
9.   Surveys/Questionnaire


Document analysis:

Document analysis is one of the most helpful elicitation techniques in understanding the current process. Documents like user manuals, software vendor manuals, process documents about the current system can provide the inputs for the new system requirements.
The steps involved in document analysis are as follows:

Evaluating whether the existing system and business documents are appropriate to be studied.
Analyzing the documents to identify relevant business details.
Reviewing and confirming identified details with subject matter experts.

Observation:


This elicitation technique helps in collecting requirements by observing users or stakeholders. This can provide information about the exiting process, inputs and outputs.

There are two kinds of observations

1)   Active
2)   Passive.

In active observation, the business analyst directly observes the users or stakeholders, whereas in passive observation the business analyst observes the subject matter experts (SME?s).
This helps the business team understand the requirements when users are unable to explain requirements clearly.

Interview:

An interview is a systematic approach to elicit information from a person or group of people. In this case, the business analyst acts as an interviewer. An interview provides an opportunity to explore and/or clarify requirements in more detail. Without knowing the expectations and goals of the stakeholders it is difficult to fulfil requirements. There are two types of interviews.

1)   Structured Interview:
In Structured interview the business analyst will act as the interviewer and prepares some of the questions that has to be asked for the stake holders.

2)   Unstructured Interview:

In Unstructured interview the business analyst will act as the interviewer and will have a face to face general discussion with the stake holders.
 
Prototyping:

Screen mockups can support the requirement gathering process, when introduced at the correct time. Mockups help stakeholders visualize the functionality of a system. This can be an advantage to business analysts and stakeholders since this allows them to identify gaps/problems early on.


Brainstorming:

Brainstorming is an efficient way to define their requirements. Users can come up with very innovative ideas or requirements. This can help gather ideas and creative solutions from stakeholders in a short time.

Workshop:

A requirement workshop is a structured way to capture requirements. Workshops are used to scope, discover, define, and prioritize requirements for the proposed system.
Workshops compress of some users and the stakeholder who work together to identify the requirements.
They are the most effective way to deliver high-quality requirements quickly. They promote mutual understanding and strong communication between users or stakeholders and the project team.

JAD (Joint Application Development):

Joint Application Development (JAD) technique is an extended session to the workshop. In the JAD session stakeholders and project team works together to identify the requirements. These sessions allow the business team to gather and consolidate large amounts of information. Identification of stakeholders is the critical to the overall success of the JAD session. The JAD team includes business process owners, client representatives, users or stakeholders, business analysts, project managers, IT experts (developers, quality assurance, designers, and security).

Reverse engineering:

In migration projects we use reverse engineering projects. If an existing system has outdated documentation, it can be reverse engineered to understand what the system does. This is an elicitation technique that can extract implemented requirements from the system.

There are two types of reverse engineering techniques.

Black box reverse engineering: Without examining its internal structure the system is studied in black box reverse engineering.

White box reverse engineering: The inner workings of the system are studied in white box reverse engineering.

Surveys/Questionnaires:

Questionnaires are useful when there is a lot of information to be gathered from a larger group of stakeholders. This enables the business team to gather requirements from stakeholders remotely. The design of the questionnaire is very important, since it can influence the answers that people provide. The business analyst will prepare some questions which are to be asked to the stake holders.

« Last Edit: September 18, 2020, 09:24:40 pm by 1202908006 »