Author Topic: Elicitation Techniques in Business Analysis  (Read 15746 times)

1200697404

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Re: Elicitation Techniques in Business Analysis
« Reply #60 on: March 19, 2021, 03:13:44 pm »
Requirement Elicitation Techniques:

1. Brainstorming
2. Document Analysis
3. Reverse Engineering
4. Focus Groups
5. Observation
6. Workshop
7. JAD(Joint Application Development)
8. Interview
9. Prototyping
10. Questionnaire(Survey)

1200160509

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Re: Elicitation Techniques in Business Analysis
« Reply #61 on: May 06, 2021, 10:40:58 pm »
Requirement elicitation is the process of collecting information from stakeholders. It serves as a foundation in documenting the requirements for application development.
There are a number of elicitation techniques to gather requirements or to collect the information from the stakeholders. Some of the requirement elicitation techniques are as follows.

1. Document analysis
2. Observation
3. Interview
4. Prototyping
5. Brainstorming
6. Workshop
7. JAD (Joint Application Development)
8. Reverse engineering
9. Surveys/Questionnaire

1202147611

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Re: Elicitation Techniques in Business Analysis
« Reply #62 on: May 07, 2021, 11:45:29 am »
Elicitation is significant as numerous partners can't precisely verbalize the business issue. In this way, experts playing out the elicitation need to guarantee that the necessities delivered are obviously justifiable, helpful and significant.
Here are the 9 elicitation techniques defined by the Business Analysis Body of Knowledge for business analysts:

?   Document Analysis
?   Brainstorming
?   Focus Groups
?   Interviews
?   Interface Analysis
?   Prototyping
?   Observation
?   Questionnaire
?   Requirements Workshops

Documentary Analysis: It is a sort of subjective exploration where reports are checked on by the expert to survey an evaluation topic. Taking apart reports includes coding content into subjects like how center gathering or meeting records are examined.

Brainstorming: It is a gathering innovativeness strategy by which endeavors are made to discover a decision for a particular issue by get-together a rundown of thoughts precipitously contributed by its individuals

Focus Groups: It is a gathering meeting including few demographically comparative individuals. Their responses to explicit scientist offered conversation starters are considered. Focus groups are utilized in statistical surveying. The conversations can be guided or open

Interview: It is a fundamentally a coordinated conversation where one part presents requests, and different offers responses. In like way discourse, "interview" implies a one-on-one conversation between an interviewer and an interviewee

Interface Analysis: It is a business analysis elicitation method that assists with recognizing interfaces between arrangements/applications to decide the necessities for guaranteeing that the parts associate with each other successfully.

Prototyping: It is an early example, model, or arrival of an item worked to test an idea or interaction. It is a term utilized in an assortment of settings, including semantics, plan, hardware, and programming. A model is for the most part used to assess another plan to improve exactness by framework experts and clients.

Observation: It is the dynamic obtaining of data from an essential source. In living creatures, observation utilizes the faculties. In science, observation can likewise include the insight and recording of information through the utilization of logical instruments.

Questionnaire: It is any composed arrangement of inquiries, while a review is both the arrangement of inquiries and the way toward gathering, accumulating, and breaking down the reactions from those inquiries.

Requirements workshop: It can be characterized as an organized and worked with occasion for getting deliberately chosen partners together to find, refine, focus on, approve and examine requirements. A talented facilitator generally oversees workshop meetings.
These are the couple of Elicitation techniques which are utilized by the Business Analyst for better comprehension of the Client?s prerequisites.

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Re: Elicitation Techniques in Business Analysis
« Reply #63 on: May 28, 2021, 06:59:07 pm »
There are a number of elicitation techniques to gather requirements or to collect the information from the stakeholders. Some of the requirement elicitation techniques are as follows.

Document analysis
Observation
Interview
Prototyping
Brainstorming
Workshop
JAD (Joint Application Development)
Reverse engineering
Surveys/Questionnaire

Vibha Singh

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Re: Elicitation Techniques in Business Analysis
« Reply #64 on: May 29, 2021, 11:38:11 am »
Requirements elicitation techniques are methods used by analysts to determine the needs of customers and users, so that systems can be built with a high probability of satisfying those needs.
Some of the requirement elicitation technique are as follow:

1.Brainstorming: To facilitate focused and fruitful brainstorming sessions, business analysts should set up a team with representatives of all stakeholders for capturing new ideas. Suggestions coming out of brainstorming sessions should be properly documented in order to draft the plan of action.

2.Document analysis: business analysts review existing documentation at hand, with the intent of identifying requirements for changes or improvements. Examples of document analysis sources include pre-existing project plans, system specifications, process documentation, market research dossiers, customer feedback, meeting minutes, and user manuals.

3.JAD: JAD (Joint Application Development) is a methodology that involves the client or end user in the design and development of an application, through a succession of collaborative workshops called JAD sessions.

4.Prototying: prototyping enables business owners and end-users to visualize realistic models of applications before they are finally developed. Prototyping helps generate early feedback, and it boosts stakeholder participation in requirements elicitation.

5.Interview: Interview is a formal conversation between the interviewer and respondent wherein the two participates in the question answer session. This is an open ended session.

6.Observation: The observation technique is an effective means of deciphering how a user does their job by conducting an assessment of their work environment. This technique can be used to verify requirements and deliver instant requirements worthy of consideration.

7.Reverse Engineering: Reverse engineering is a systematic approach for analyzing the design of existing devices or systems.

8.Questionnaire/Survey: The questionnaire is prepared in such a way that it translates the required information into a series of questions, that client or stakeholders can and will answer.

9.Focus Group: Business analysts review existing documentation at hand, with the intent of identifying requirements for changes or improvements. Examples of document analysis sources include pre-existing project plans, system specifications, process documentation, market research dossiers, customer feedback, meeting minutes, and user manuals.

10.Workshop: workshops are one of the most resource-efficient methods to elicit requirements. Intense, focused, and highly productive workshops have a key role to play in getting all parties onto the same page. Workshop events help Subject Matter Experts and Stakeholders to collaborate, resolve conflicts, and come to an agreement.

The elicitation process actively engages stakeholders and promotes collaboration, encouraging conflicting opinions to reach a consensus.

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Re: Elicitation Techniques in Business Analysis
« Reply #65 on: June 01, 2021, 12:07:43 pm »
Requirement elicitation is the process of collecting information from stakeholders. It serves as a foundation in documenting the requirements for application development.
There are a number of elicitation techniques to gather requirements or to collect information from the stakeholders. Some of the requirement elicitation techniques are as follows.
Document analysis
Observation
Interview
Prototyping
Brainstorming
Workshop
JAD (Joint Application Development)
Reverse engineering
Surveys/Questionnaire
Document analysis
Document analysis is one of the most helpful elicitation techniques in understanding the current process. Documents like user manuals, software vendor manuals, process documents about the current system can provide the inputs for the new system requirements.
Steps involved in document analysis are:
Evaluating whether the existing system and business documents are appropriate to be studied.
Analyzing the documents to identify relevant business details.
Reviewing and confirming identified details with subject matter experts.
There could be a lot of information that can be transferred to a new system requirements document. Evaluating the documentation can assist in making the As-Is process document, and conducting GAP analysis for scoping of the project in question.
Observation
This elicitation technique helps in collecting requirements by observing users or stakeholders. This can provide information about the exiting process, inputs, and outputs. There are two kinds of observations ? active and passive.
Inactive observation, the business analyst directly observes the users or stakeholders, whereas in passive observation the business analyst observes the subject matter experts.
This helps the business team understand the requirements when users are unable to explain requirements clearly.
Interview
An interview is a systematic approach to elicit information from a person or group of people. In this case, the business analyst acts as an interviewer. An interview provides an opportunity to explore and/or clarify requirements in more detail. Without knowing the expectations and goals of the stakeholders it is difficult to fulfill requirements.
Prototyping
Screen mockups can support the requirement gathering process when introduced at the correct time. Mockups help stakeholders visualize the functionality of a system. This can be an advantage to business analysts and stakeholders since this allows them to identify gaps/problems early on.
Brainstorming
Brainstorming is an efficient way to define their requirements. Users can come up with very innovative ideas or requirements. This can help gather ideas and creative solutions from stakeholders in a short time.
Users or stakeholders can come up with ideas that they have seen or experienced elsewhere. These ideas can be reviewed and the relevant ones can then be included in the system requirements.
Workshop
Workshops comprise a group of users or stakeholders working together to identify requirements. A requirement workshop is a structured way to capture requirements. Workshops are used to scope, discover, define, and prioritize requirements for the proposed system.
They are the most effective way to deliver high-quality requirements quickly. They promote mutual understanding and strong communication between users or stakeholders and the project team.
JAD (Joint Application Development)
The Joint Application Development (JAD) technique is an extended session to the workshop. In the JAD session, stakeholders and the project team work together to identify the requirements. These sessions allow the business team to gather and consolidate large amounts of information. Identification of stakeholders is critical to the overall success of the JAD session. The JAD team includes business process owners, client representatives, users or stakeholders, business analysts, project managers, IT experts (developers, quality assurance, designers, and security).
Reverse engineering
This elicitation technique is generally used in migration projects. If an existing system has outdated documentation, it can be reverse-engineered to understand what the system does. This is an elicitation technique that can extract implemented requirements from the system.
There are two types of reverse engineering techniques.
Black box reverses engineering: The system is studied without examining its internal structure (function and composition of software).
White box reverses engineering: The inner workings of the system are studied (analyzing and understanding of software code).
Surveys/Questionnaires
Questionnaires are useful when there is a lot of information to be gathered from a larger group of stakeholders. This enables the business team to gather requirements from stakeholders remotely. The design of the questionnaire is very important since it can influence the answers that people provide.
In addition to the above-mentioned elicitation techniques, there are many more are on the market. It is very difficult to say which elicitation technique is suitable for all projects. Not all elicitation techniques can be executed for every project.
When selecting an elicitation method, factors such as the nature of the project, organizational structure, and type of stakeholders are taken into account by the business team before deciding which technique works best. Having said that, brainstorming, document analysis, interviews, prototyping, and workshops are the most widely used requirement elicitation techniques.

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Re: Elicitation Techniques in Business Analysis
« Reply #66 on: June 03, 2021, 07:00:57 pm »
Elicitation techniques are used to get most of the information about requirements from stakeholders, subject matter experts (SME).
These are proactive in nature as against requirements gathering. Elicitation is a technique which span across all the stages of project lifecycle.
Some of the commonly used techniques are-
1. Brainstorming (Brainstorming works by focusing on a topic or problem, and then coming up with many radical solutions to it. This technique is best applied in a group as it draws on the experience and creativity of all members of the group)

2. Document analysis (Document analysis is a means to elicit requirements of an existing system by studying available documentation and identifying relevant information. Document analysis is used if the objective is to gather details of the "As Is" environment such as existing business rules)

3. Focus groups (A focus group is composed of pre-qualified individuals whose purpose is to discuss and comment on a topic. This is an opportunity for individuals to share their own perspectives and discuss them in a group setting.)

4. Interface analysis (Interface analysis helps to clarify the boundaries of the system. It distinguishes which system provides specific functionality along with the input and output data needs.)

5. Interview (An interview is a systematic approach to elicit information from a person or group of people in an informal or formal setting by talking to the person. In an interview, a business analyst formally or informally directs his/her questions to: a stakeholder / a subject-matter-expert / a potential user to obtain answers that finally take the shape of requirements)

6. Observation (Observation is a means to elicit requirements by conducting an assessment of the subject matter expert's work environment.)

7. Prototyping (aims to uncover and visualize interface requirements before the application is designed or developed)

8. Survey / Questionnaire (A survey is a means of eliciting information from many people, anonymously, in a relatively short time. A survey can collect information about customers, products, work practices and attitudes. A survey is often referred to as a questionnaire.)

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Re: Elicitation Techniques in Business Analysis
« Reply #67 on: June 16, 2021, 01:09:50 pm »
*Brainstorming
*Document Analysis
*Observation
*Prototyping
*Survey/Questionnaire

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Re: Elicitation Techniques in Business Analysis
« Reply #68 on: June 16, 2021, 01:13:02 pm »
document analysis
brainstroming
interviews
prototyping
observation
experting

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Re: Elicitation Techniques in Business Analysis
« Reply #69 on: June 23, 2021, 09:46:29 pm »
Various elicitation techniques provided by business analyst are:
Brainstorming
Document Analysis
Focus Groups
JAD
Interface Analysis
Interviews
Observation
Prototyping
Requirements Workshops
Reverse Engineering
Survey/Questionnaire

1212282002

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Re: Elicitation Techniques in Business Analysis
« Reply #70 on: July 29, 2021, 02:31:44 pm »
Elicitation Techniques are:
1. Questionnaire
2. Brainstorming
3. Screen mockups- To get 3C advantage -Correct, complete, consistent
4. Interview
5. Interface Analysis

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Re: Elicitation Techniques in Business Analysis
« Reply #71 on: August 03, 2021, 10:34:20 am »
Elicitation techniques in business analysis are
1 Stakeholder analysis
2 Brainstorming
3 Interview
4 Document analysis
5 Focus group
6 Interface analysis
7 Observation
8 Prototyping
9 Joint application development workshops
10 Quetionnaires

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Re: Elicitation Techniques in Business Analysis
« Reply #72 on: August 09, 2021, 10:02:52 am »
The business analyst uses the elicitation techniques.

In Business analyst, Elicitation is one of the area that both extremely complex and extremely simple.

Simply, The discovering process of the requirements is known as elicitation. The project requirement details and scope comes stakeholders to understand their expectations and needs to engaging in particular elicitations.

The Elicitation Techniques

Here the list of Business analyst used primary techniques of elicitation :

1.Brainstorming ?

It is to generating new solution or ideas from free form discussion.

 

2.Analysis of Document ?

It is to understand the requirements of potential by Existing Documentation Analysis.

 

Focus Groups-
For getting feedbacks from the stakeholders external to the organization by conducting small group discussions with stakeholders.

 

4.Analysis of interface ?

For enable integration by understating future state requirements and current state requirements by analysing the interface between the systems or between the system and user.

 

5.Interviews ?

Focusing conversations by asking specific questions of requirements to an individual stakeholders or group of stakeholders.

 

6.Observation ?

To understating the process details, by observing completing business process or job functions of a stakeholder.

Prototyping ?
To elicit requirement, is there any conformation or any new ideas with stakeholders by reviewing possible solutions by creating visual representation.

 

Workshop requirements ?
The documentation requirements to designed to discover, analyse and validate by meetings which more longer time duration like minimum half day and can spent some days, which high level structured and more formal.

 

Questionnaire or Survey ?
The specific questions of a answer in feedback a request for a unstructured or structured. The useful information gather from the large number of stakeholders and the decision by which potential impact to discover information.

 

 

Here, So many Business analysts worried about who are new they should use all techniques but they are not getting right elicitation, and in this areas they are thinking about their experience and it shows that the reviews and casual conversations for getting information about needs of stakeholders takes more time.

This is the area business analyst should have relevant experience. And also even senior most business analysts are also  can?t stop improving in this area.

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Re: Elicitation Techniques in Business Analysis
« Reply #73 on: October 01, 2021, 08:02:17 pm »
Elicitation is the process of collecting information from stakeholders. It serves as a foundation in documenting the requirements for application development. There are a number of elicitation techniques to gather requirements or to collect the information from the stakeholders. Some of the requirement elicitation techniques are as follows.
1.   Document analysis
2.   Observation
3.   Interview
4.   Prototyping
5.   Brainstorming
6.   Workshop
7.   JAD (Joint Application Development)
8.   Reverse engineering
9.   Surveys/Questionnaire
Document analysis
Document analysis is one of the most helpful elicitation techniques in understanding the current process. Documents like user manuals, software vendor manuals, process documents about the current system can provide the inputs for the new system requirements.
Steps involved in document analysis are:
?   Evaluating whether the existing system and business documents are appropriate to be studied.
?   Analyzing the documents to identify relevant business details.
?   Reviewing and confirming identified details with subject matter experts.
There could be a lot of information that can be transferred to a new system requirements document. Evaluating the documentation can assist in making the As-Is process document, and conducting GAP analysis for scoping of the project in question.
Observation
This elicitation technique helps in collecting requirements by observing users or stakeholders. This can provide information about the exiting process, inputs and outputs. There are two kinds of observations ? active and passive.
In active observation, the business analyst directly observes the users or stakeholders, whereas in passive observation the business analyst observes the subject matter experts.
This helps the business team understand the requirements when users are unable to explain requirements clearly.
Interview
An interview is a systematic approach to elicit information from a person or group of people. In this case, the business analyst acts as an interviewer. An interview provides an opportunity to explore and/or clarify requirements in more detail. Without knowing the expectations and goals of the stakeholders it is difficult to fulfill requirements.
Prototyping
Screen mockups can support the requirement gathering process, when introduced at the correct time. Mockups help stakeholders visualize the functionality of a system. This can be an advantage to business analysts and stakeholders since this allows them to identify gaps/problems early on.
Brainstorming
Brainstorming is an efficient way to define their requirements. Users can come up with very innovative ideas or requirements. This can help gather ideas and creative solutions from stakeholders in a short time.
Users or stakeholders can come up with ideas that they have seen or experienced elsewhere. These ideas can be reviewed and the relevant ones can then be included in the system requirements.
Workshop
Workshops comprise a group of users or stakeholders working together to identify requirements. A requirement workshop is a structured way to capture requirements. Workshops are used to scope, discover, define, and prioritize requirements for the proposed system.
They are the most effective way to deliver high-quality requirements quickly. They promote mutual understanding and strong communication between users or stakeholders and the project team.
JAD (Joint Application Development)
Joint Application Development (JAD) technique is an extended session to the workshop. In the JAD session stakeholders and project team works together to identify the requirements. These sessions allow the business team to gather and consolidate large amounts of information. Identification of stakeholders is the critical to the overall success of the JAD session. The JAD team includes business process owners, client representatives, users or stakeholders, business analysts, project managers, IT experts (developers, quality assurance, designers, and security).
Reverse engineering
This elicitation technique is generally used in migration projects. If an existing system has outdated documentation, it can be reverse engineered to understand what the system does. This is an elicitation technique that can extract implemented requirements from the system.
There are two types of reverse engineering techniques.
Black box reverse engineering: The system is studied without examining its internal structure (function and composition of software).
White box reverse engineering: The inner workings of the system are studied (analysing and understanding of software code).
Surveys/Questionnaires
Questionnaires are useful when there is a lot of information to be gathered from a larger group of stakeholders. This enables the business team to gather requirements from stakeholders remotely. The design of the questionnaire is very important, since it can influence the answers that people provide.
In addition to the above-mentioned elicitation techniques, there are many more are on the market. It is very difficult to say that which elicitation technique is suitable for all projects. Not all elicitation techniques can be executed for every project.
When selecting an elicitation method, factors such as the nature of the project, organizational structure and type of stakeholders are taken into account by the business team before deciding which technique works best. Having said that, brainstorming, document analysis, interviews, prototyping and workshops are the most widely used requirement elicitation techniques.


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Re: Elicitation Techniques in Business Analysis
« Reply #74 on: October 03, 2021, 08:53:10 pm »
    Requirements Elicitation Techniques
        #1) Stakeholder Analysis
        #2) Brainstorming
        #3) Interview
        #4) Document Analysis/Review
        #5) Focus Group
        #6) Interface Analysis
        #7) Observation
        #8) Prototyping
        #9) Joint Application Development (JAD)/ Requirement Workshops
        #10) Survey/Questionnaire