Author Topic: SME  (Read 4356 times)

SatyaPrasadB

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SME
« on: January 08, 2016, 07:39:24 pm »
who is SME? how an SME can influence a project outcomes. what is the difference between SPOC and SME?
Satyaprasadbvs

Pavan

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Re: SME
« Reply #1 on: January 09, 2016, 02:04:33 pm »
Hi,

SME is basically a domain expert who can explain the functionalities in a better way to understand .

SPOC : may act as SME in some cases however SPOC can be a repository to particular module or information.

Please correct me if i am wrong.



ShekarJ

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Re: SME
« Reply #2 on: February 04, 2016, 08:16:55 am »
Hello,

SME is a subject matter expert as mentioned by Pavan.

SPOC is a single point of contact who directs us or helps us in identifying the appropriate stakeholders of which SME being one.

Your Comments are appreciated.

Cheers..

GRaviKiran

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Re: SME
« Reply #3 on: February 19, 2016, 11:48:15 am »
Hi,

As Pavan said SME is a Subject Mater Expert and SPOC is single point of contact but an SME may or May not be a SPOC

SPOC will be helping us in only a single module or a particular details what he wants but SME has a Knowledge on whole system

Correct me if i am wrong

Shivraj Hiremath

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Re: SME
« Reply #4 on: March 08, 2016, 12:17:00 pm »
Difference between Subject Matter Expert (SME) and Single point of Contact (SPOC)

SME - A SME as the name suggests is a person who knows the respective domain and its functioning, more than that s/he knows the peculiar terms/terminology. An SME can be either a person who has worked practically in the field of domain (for e.g. a bank manager who has worked in the banks and knows that functioning of how bank runs) OR he can be a person who has assisted in designing a solution for the people of that domain (for e.g. an IT guy who has designed a product for the automation of the banking activities). Therefore, an SME has a certain insight of the domain he is working on and can train/assist the other team members in imparting the knowledge gained. The process of becoming an SME happens in the due course and not instantly, it takes time and resources to gain the much needed knowledge on the same.

Whereas, A SPOC is a person who specifically does not need any domain knowledge but instead should know whom to contact to during the operations. SPOC usually consists of a person who acts as a link between 2 teams (client <-> development team, Testing-Development, marketing <-> accounts etc. and so on). In order to be an effective SPOC, the person should have the knack of communicating to people and getting the work done (I was an SPOC between client and development team and was responsible for keeping track of client requirements including deadlines and also pushing the development team to deliver the same).

I shall include more as and when I remember any more points on it.

171035406

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Re: SME
« Reply #5 on: August 27, 2017, 04:41:06 pm »
The Subject Matter Expert (SME) is responsible for defining the business processes, the business policies and the application requirements. He leads the business rules acquisition activities as a domain expert.

A point of contact (POC) or single point of contact (SPOC) is a person or a department serving as the coordinator or focal point of information concerning an activity or program. A SPOC is used in many cases where information is time-sensitive and accuracy is important.

Pranjal Dutta

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Re: SME
« Reply #6 on: August 30, 2017, 05:15:10 pm »
SME is the abbreviation of Subject Matter Expert and as name says, is a Industrial Domain Expert who has excellent knowledge about the whole Business processes. One Business Analyst may seek of SME if BA has no clear understanding of the domain.

Whereas SPOC or Single Point of Contact is the person, who knows, whom to contact for a specific operation in the Business Processes. Business Analyst may need help of SPOC to identify the stakeholders (including the SME) for the given project.

111222333

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Re: SME
« Reply #7 on: September 19, 2017, 05:26:11 pm »
SME : This stands for Subject Matter Expert. SME is a person who is an expert in a particular topic or area.

As SME is an expert in a particular area, he has a greater knowledge and can suggest the various things which can be overlooked while designing or development phase. SME may also have been aware of the problems and can help suggest more feasible solutions in less time thus increasing the performance.

Difference between a SPOC and SME
SME is a person who is an expert in a particular topic or area whereas, single point of contact (SPOC) is a person or a department serving as the coordinator or focal point of information concerning an activity or program.

1172904607

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Re: SME
« Reply #8 on: October 14, 2017, 04:57:37 pm »
Hi,
A business analyst is responsible for the deliverable of a project – the beginning, middle, and end.  She/he is also responsible for many areas of the project – the scope assessment, risk assessment, mapping, business cases, use cases, and business process documentation.
Most Business Analysts are not working within the business that is asking them for help with change or introduction of a new product.  This is where your SMEs or subject matter experts come in.

When I am learning about a change in a company, how a department works, how a process works – I want to talk to the SMEs because they know the inner workings of the department from the bottom up.  Often they have started at an entry level position (not always) and worked their way up so that they fully understand how their team works, how the processes work, what works and what doesn’t and the subtle nuances that we as BAs miss.

SMEs are invaluable resources for understanding how the change will affect the department, and how to introduce change so that it will be received in the most positive way.

For each capability in your SAP implementation, your implementation needs to identify a Single Point of Contacts (SPOC). A SPOC is team member who is a Subject Matter Expert (SME) in her/his SPOC capability area with good contacts within the organization and excellent communication and decision making skills.

Without a SPOC there will be too many decision makers (or in worst cases, no decision makers at all) causing conflicts and delays to implementations. This is no single person who owns the capability and when issues crop up, team members tend to point at others. The basic idea to have a SPOC is provide clear direction and decisions and not to find a person to blame.
 
At a very high level your implementation need to have SPOCs at least from these 3 areas.
Business SPOCs – Example Payroll, Time Management, and Sales Contracts/Quotes, Master Data (Customer, Material, and Vendor) etc…
Functional SPOCs – SAP HR Payroll, SAP Time Management, SAP OTC (Order to Cash), SAP Master Data etc…
Technical SPOCs – SAP Technical Development, SAP Basis & Security, SAP Portal etc…
 
SPOC is the central team member for that capability. He/She will be completely responsible for the success of the capability and shall be kept in the loop involving any changes to any of the elements in the capability.
SPOC should be a capable mature team member who can provide direction and timely decisions, bring the team together and get issues resolved. A week SPOC will lead to SPOF (Single point of failure)
SAP Project team should know who the SPOCs are and how they can be contacted.
 
In one of the SAP Implementation that I worked we had SPOCs for each of the Master Data Areas – Customer Master, Vendor Master & Material Master. Due to the nature of legacy data, we had around 100+ systems where master data used to me maintained. These SPOCs are highly knowledgeable and experienced in their area and helped our SAP team at every stage of the project and made our implementation successful.

170832105

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Re: SME
« Reply #9 on: October 19, 2017, 07:36:33 pm »
SME (Subject Mater Expert ) is  aperson who have commendable knowledge in particular area of domain. This is normally seen in Software and ITES(Information Technology Enabled Services) segments.When an intern joins in a organization he is given training and once they are done with training they are observed on the field or real time scenarios. SME guides the employees if there are any concerns related to that domain.
SME’s are very useful in developing training materials. Books, manuals, and technical documentation are developed by technical writers and  instructional designers in conjunctions with SMEs. Technical communicators interview SMEs to extract information and convert it into a form suitable for the audience. SMEs are often required to sign off on the documents or training developed, checking it for technical accuracy
The SME tells the software developers what needs to be done by the computer system, and how the SME intends to use it. The SME may interact directly with the system, possibly through a simplified interface, or may modiy the coding of domain knowledge for use of the knowledge engineers


171036906

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Re: SME
« Reply #10 on: November 11, 2017, 09:30:33 am »
A subject matter expert in business (also known as SME) is an individual with a deep understanding of a particular process, function, technology, machine, material or type of equipment. Individuals designated as subject matter experts are typically sought out by others interested in learning more about or leveraging their unique expertise to solve specific problems or help meet particular technical challenges.


Subject matter experts in some fields often serve as expert witnesses in lawsuits and other legal actions.

Typically, subject matter experts have developed their expertise in their particular discipline over a long period of time and after a great deal of immersion in the topic. Many subject matter experts have pursued advanced degrees in their area of specialization. Additionally, the experts maintain a rigorous program of continuous study in their field. Many are active as authors, publishing books or articles on their topic. Others serve as educators in college and universities. This additional work and study helps ensure the SME individual maintains a current and complete knowledge of their specific area of expertise.

It is common to draw upon a subject matter expert when attempting to navigate a particularly difficult challenge or problem. While many professionals are cross trained in their particular functions, some situations call for highly specialized knowledge. 

Information technology professionals will call upon various subject matter experts for insights into integrating new software applications or, fixing bugs or anomalies discovered during testing. 

Architects and engineers will call upon experts when considering new building technologies or design approaches.
Project teams engage subject matter experts when their more generalized knowledge of a topic is insufficient for the problem in front of them.
In the legal industry, expert witnesses are typically highly specialized subject matter experts called upon to testify in court cases, especially liability lawsuits.
Innovators striving to apply new technologies or advancements will often draw upon the originators or external specialists to help them solve specific technical or business challenges.

1171429110

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Re: SME
« Reply #11 on: December 06, 2017, 08:07:13 pm »
The Subject Matter Expert is that individual who exhibits the highest level of expertise in performing a specialized job, task, or skill within the organization.

A SME might be a software engineer, a help desk support operative, an accounts manager, a scientific researcher: in short, anybody with in-depth knowledge of the subject you are attempting to document. You need to talk to SMEs in the research phase of a documentation project (to get your facts straight) and you need to involve them in the technical validation of your drafts (to make sure that your interpretation of information matches theirs).

A subject matter expert, or SME, is someone who is the master of their own specific area of expertise. If you need to know about that particular topic, then this expert is the person you absolutely need to speak with!

1171921109

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Re: SME
« Reply #12 on: January 21, 2018, 09:55:11 pm »
My view is that while business domain knowledge does matter, analysis skills and experience are far more important. It is certainly important to have a basic understanding of the industry in which you are working, as this helps you to know which questions to ask when starting a project.  However,  this knowledge is something that can be expanded upon over time as you gain exposure to more and more projects.  In fact, in my experience, new BAs from outside industries are often able to add a huge amount of value by “questioning” standard industry norms and conventions and adding a new focus on true objectivity.

To draw an analogy, I view core Business Analysis work as a bit like driving a car.  You learn a core set of techniques up-front and learn even more when you apply them in all sorts of terrains and adverse conditions.  You learn to be creative and use different tools and techniques when need to get a particular result.

Changing industries as a BA is a little like driving in an unfamiliar country.  You need to know the basic rules of the road and you need a map.  But once you have these things, you can drive as effectively and efficiently as you could back home (using all or most of the same techniques).

Driving is driving. The analysis is analysis. In both cases, you need a map of the landscape, and you need to read the map before you set out. However, you don’t need to understand the mechanics of the engine at the outset – and if you do eventually need to know this there will hopefully be a mechanic (SME) to help you!

However, I do believe that there are a number of core skills above and beyond the benchmark BA competencies that are of particular relevance when changing industries or projects

1180649001

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Re: SME
« Reply #13 on: February 06, 2018, 06:26:41 pm »
In simple terms SME is referred as Subject Matter Expert which is the literal answer, to explain more he/she is the one who has vast knowledge on domain and process whom you can trust and refer to in case if you have any doubts or clarification and also for gaining the knowledge.

1171948312

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Re: SME
« Reply #14 on: February 13, 2018, 06:28:30 pm »
SME- Subject Matter Expert, who has immense domain knowledge and who can help the technical team if they any queries related to the functionality of the project. He acts as Backbone to the team whenever needed.