Author Topic: use case actors  (Read 12860 times)

1192574505

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Re: use case actors
« Reply #45 on: July 26, 2019, 06:06:26 pm »
Primary actor who initaies the actor
secondary actor who assists the primary actor

1192767805

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Re: use case actors
« Reply #46 on: August 03, 2019, 10:02:31 am »
Primary Actors: The Actor(s) using the system to achieve a goal. The Use Case documents the interactions between the system and the actors to achieve the goal of the primary actor.

Secondary Actors: Actors that the system needs assistance from to achieve the primary actor’s goal.
Secondary actors may or may not have goals that they expect to be satisfied by the use case, the primary actor always has a goal, and the use case exists to satisfy the primary actor.

1190244102

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Re: use case actors
« Reply #47 on: August 03, 2019, 08:02:43 pm »
Primary Actor: The primary actor of a use case is the stakeholder that calls on the system to deliver one of its services. It has a goal with respect to the system – one that can be satisfied by its operation. The primary actor is often, but not always, the actor who triggers the use case.

 

Supporting Actors: A supporting actor in a use case in an external actor that provides a service to the system under design. It might be a high-speed printer, a web service, or humans that have to do some research and get back to us.

1190538101

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Re: use case actors
« Reply #48 on: October 04, 2019, 07:19:35 pm »
users can play. Sometimes the actor will just be called "User," but is often given a specific role name. For example, our Internet Bookstore system will have actors called Webmaster, Stock Purchaser, Shipping Clerk, and Customer. The user (actor) is external to the system—he or she is on the "outside," whereas the system is on the "inside." Actors can represent nonhuman external systems as well as people. Sometimes people are confused by this notion; we've found that drawing a "robot stick figure" icon seems to clear this up.
An association from the actor to a use case means that the actor is the one who carries out that use case. The association can also signify responsibilities. For example, an Administrator pointing to a Moderate Forum Messages use case means "The administrator is responsible for moderating forum messages."
You can have more than one actor pointing to one use case, which simply means that the use case is associated with more than one role. Similarly, a user can serve as more than one type of actor; the same user might be both the Stock Purchaser and the Shipping Clerk.

1192357311

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Re: use case actors
« Reply #49 on: December 17, 2019, 05:27:39 pm »
Primary Use Case Actor: An actor that calls on the system to deliver one of its services. It has a goal and will be satisfied by the operations.

Secondary Actor: An external actor who provides services to the system.

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Re: use case actors
« Reply #50 on: December 29, 2019, 07:25:15 pm »
USE CASE ACTORS:
Use Case Actors will do the  work regarding the use case  specifications.
According to the Use Case work .

1200182002

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Re: use case actors
« Reply #51 on: April 11, 2020, 02:22:00 pm »
Primary Actor: a user whose defined user goal and is fulfilled by the system

The primary actor of a use case is the stakeholder that calls on the system to deliver one of its services. It has a goal with respect to the system – one that can be satisfied by its operation. The primary actor is often, but not always, the actor who triggers the use case.
Supporting Actors: a user who provides a service (e.g., information) to the system.

A supporting actor (also known as a secondary actor) in a use case in an external actor that provides a service to the system under design. It might be a high-speed printer, a web service, or humans that have to do some research and get back to us.

1202988602

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Re: use case actors
« Reply #52 on: June 06, 2020, 03:30:59 pm »
Actors that the system you are describing interacts with,
Primary actor initiates the system to work and system depends on secondary actor for information.

1202988902

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Re: use case actors
« Reply #53 on: June 18, 2020, 03:34:44 pm »
An actor is behaviored classifier which specifies a role played by an external entity that interacts with the subject (e.g., by exchanging signals and data), a human user of the designed system, some other system or hardware using services of the subject.

The term "role" is used informally as some type, group or particular facet of users that require specific services from the subject modeled with associated use cases. When an external entity interacts with the subject, it plays the role of a specific actor. That single physical entity may play several different roles, and a specific role may be played by single or multiple different instances.

Since an actor is external to the subject, it is typically defined in the same classifier or package that incorporates the subject.

All actors must have names according to the assumed role. Examples of actor names (user roles):

Customer
Web Client
Student
Passenger
Payment System
Standard UML notation for actor is "stick man" icon with the name of the actor above or below of the icon. Actor names should follow the capitalization and punctuation guidelines for classes. The names of abstract actors should be shown in italics.

Use case actor as a stick man.
Student actor

Custom icons that convey the kind of actor may also be used to denote an actor, such as using a separate icon(s) for non-human actors.

Use case actor shown as custom web client icon.
Custom icon for Web Client actor

Use case actor shown as custom bank icon.
Custom icon for Bank actor

An actor may also be shown as a class rectangle with the standard keyword ?actor?, having usual notation for class compartments, if needed.

Use case actor shown as Class.
Customer actor as Class

An actor can only have binary associations to use cases, components, and classes.

Business Actor
A business actor (introduced in Rational Unified Process (RUP) to support business modeling) represents a role played by some person or system external to the modeled business and interacting with the business. Note, business actor is not defined in UML standard.

Some typical examples of business actors are:

Customer
Supplier
Patron
Passenger
Authority
Bank
Each business actor represents something outside of the modeled business and should be involved with at least one business use case.

Business actor is represented in RUP by "stick man" icon with a line crossing its head.

Use case business actor as a stick man with crossed head.
Business actor Passenger

Relationships Between Actors
We can define abstract or concrete actors and specialize them using generalization relationship.

Generalization between actors is rendered as a solid directed line with a large arrowhead (same as for generalization between classes).

Generalization between use case actors
Web Client actor is abstract superclass for Administrator, Editor and Customer