Author Topic: Various steps followed by a Business Analyst  (Read 4369 times)

NareshS

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Various steps followed by a Business Analyst
« on: May 23, 2016, 02:21:11 pm »
What are the different steps that a BA will follow in sequence from the start of a project ?

GiridharanK

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Re: Various steps followed by a Business Analyst
« Reply #1 on: May 24, 2016, 09:03:56 am »
Step 1 – Get Oriented

Often as business analysts we are expected to dive in to a project and start contributing as quickly as possible to make a positive impact. Sometimes the project is already underway. Other times there are vague notions about what the project is or why it exists. We face a lot of ambiguity as business analysts and it’s our job to clarify the scope, requirements, and business objectives as quickly as possible.

But that doesn’t mean that it makes sense to get ourselves knee-deep into the detailed requirements right away. Doing so very likely means a quick start in the wrong direction.

Taking some time, whether that’s a few hours, few days, or at the very most a few weeks, to get oriented will ensure you are not only moving quickly, but also able to be an effective and confident contributor on the project.

Your key responsibilities in this step include:

Clarifying your role as the business analyst so that you are sure to create deliverables that meet stakeholder needs.
Determining the primary stakeholders to engage in defining the project’s business objectives and scope, as well as any subject matter experts to be consulted early in the project.
Understanding the project history so that you don’t inadvertently repeat work that’s already been done or rehash previously made decisions.
Understanding the existing systems and business processes so you have a reasonably clear picture of the current state that needs to change.
This is where you learn how to learn what you don’t know you don’t know, so to speak. This step gets you the information you need to be successful and effective in the context of this particular project.

Step 2 – Discover the Primary Business Objectives

It’s very common for business analysts and project managers to jump right in to defining the scope of the project. However, this can lead to unnecessary headaches. Uncovering and getting agreement on the business needs early in a project and before scope is defined is the quickest path forward to a successful project.

Your key responsibilities in this step include:

Discovering expectations from your primary stakeholders – essentially discovering the “why” behind the project. (Our BA Essentials Master Class covers 7 different business analysis techniques that can be used as part of this discovery.)
Reconciling conflicting expectations so that the business community begins the project with a shared understanding of the business objectives and are not unique to one person’s perspective.
Ensuring the business objectives are clear and actionable to provide the project team with momentum and context while defining scope and, later on, the detailed requirements.
Discovering the primary business objectives sets the stage for defining scope, ensuring that you don’t end up with a solution that solves the wrong problem or, even worse, with a solution that no one can even determine is successful or not.

Step 3 – Define Scope

A clear and complete statement of scope provides your project team the go-forward concept to realize the business needs. Scope makes the business needs tangible in such a way that multiple project team participants can envision their contribution to the project and the implementation.

Your key responsibilities in this step include:

Defining a solution approach to determine the nature and extent of technology and business process changes to be made as part of implementing the solution to the primary business objectives.
Drafting a scope statement and reviewing it with your key business and technology stakeholders until they are prepared to sign-off or buy-in to the document.
Confirming the business case to ensure that it still makes sense for your organization to invest in the project.
Scope is not an implementation plan, but it is a touchstone guiding all of the subsequent steps of the business analysis process and tasks by other project participants.

Step 4 – Formulate Your Business Analysis Plan

Your business analysis plan will bring clarity to the business analysis process that will be used to successfully define the detailed requirements for this project. Your business analysis plan is going to answer many questions for you and your project team.

Your key responsibilities in this step include:

Choosing the most appropriate types of business analysis deliverables, given the project scope, project methodology, and other key aspects of the project context.
Defining the specific list of business analysis deliverables that will completely cover the scope of the project and identifying the stakeholders who will be part of the creation and validation of each deliverable.
Identifying the timelines for completing the business analysis deliverables.
In the absence of defining a credible and realistic plan, a set of expectations may be defined for you, and often those expectations are unrealistic as they do not fully appreciate everything that goes into defining detailed requirements.

Step 5 – Define the Detailed Requirements

Detailed requirements provide your implementation team with the information they need to implement the solution. They make scope implementable.

Without clear, concise, and actionable detailed requirements, implementation teams often flounder and fail to connect the dots in such a way that delivers on the original business case for the project. 

Your key responsibilities in this step include:

Eliciting the information necessary to understand what the business community wants from a specific feature or process change.
Analyzing the information you’ve discovered and using it to create a first draft of one or more business analysis deliverables containing the detailed requirements for the project.
Reviewing and validating each deliverable with appropriate business and technology stakeholders and asking questions to fill in any gaps.
Effective business analysts consciously sequence your deliverables to be as effective as possible in driving the momentum of the project forward. Paying attention to the project’s critical path, reducing ambiguity and complexity, and generating quick wins are all factors to consider when sequencing your deliverables.

Step 6 – Support the Technical Implementation

On a typical project employing a business analyst, a significant part of the solution involves a technical implementation team building, customizing, and/or deploying software. During the technical implementation, there are many worthwhile support tasks for you to engage in that will help drive the success of the project and ensure the business objectives are met.

Your key responsibilities in this step include:

Reviewing the solution design to ensure it fulfills all of the requirements and looking for opportunities to meet additional business needs without increasing the technical scope of the project.
Updating and/or repackaging requirements documentation to make it useful for the technology design and implementation process.
Engaging with quality assurance professionals to ensure they understand the business context for the technical requirements. This responsibility may include reviewing test plans and/or test cases to ensure they represent a clear understanding of the functional requirements.
Making yourself available to answer questions and help resolve any issues that surface during the technical design, technical implementation, or testing phases of the project.
Managing requirements changes to ensure that everyone is working from up-to-date documentation and that appropriate stakeholders are involved in all decisions about change.
When appropriate, leading user acceptance testing efforts completed by the business community to ensure that the software implementation meets the needs of business end users.
All of these efforts help the implementation team fulfill the intended benefits of the project and ensure the investment made realizes a positive return.

Step 7 – Help the Business Implement the Solution

Your technology team can deliver a beautiful shiny new solution that theoretically meets the business objectives, but if your business users don’t use it as intended and go back to business-as-usual, your project won’t have delivered on the original objectives. Business analysts are increasingly getting involved in this final phase of the project to support the business.

Your key responsibilities in this step may include:

Analyzing and developing interim and future state business process documentation that articulates exactly what changes need to be made to the business process.
Training end users to ensure they understand all process and procedural changes or collaborating with training staff so they can create appropriate training materials and deliver the training.
Collaborating with business users to update other organizational assets impacted by the business process and technology changes.
This step is all about ensuring all members of the business community are prepared to embrace the changes that have been specified as part of the project.

Step 8 – Assess Value Created by the Solution

A lot happens throughout the course of a project. Business outcomes are discussed. Details are worked through. Problems, big and small, are solved. Relationships are built. Change is managed. Technology is implemented. Business users are trained to change the way they work.

In this flurry of activity and a focus on delivery, it’s easy to lose track of the big picture. Why are we making all these changes and what value do they deliver for the organization? And even more importantly, are we still on track? Meaning, is the solution we’re delivering actually delivering the value we originally anticipated?

Nothing creates more positive momentum within an organization than a track record of successful projects. But if we don’t stop and assess the value created by the solution, how do we know if we are actually operating from a track record of success?

Your key responsibilities in this step may include:

Evaluating the actual progress made against the business objectives for the project to show the extent to which the original objectives have been fulfilled.
Communicating the results to the project sponsor, and if appropriate, to the project team and all members of the organization.
Suggesting follow-up projects and initiatives to fully realize the intended business objectives of the project or to solve new problems that are discovered while evaluating the impact of this project.
After completing this step, it’s likely you’ll uncover more opportunities to improve the business which will lead you to additional projects. And so the cycle begins again!


RahulH

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Re: Various steps followed by a Business Analyst
« Reply #2 on: May 26, 2016, 09:08:02 am »
Gather Background Info
Identify Stakeholders
Discover Business Objectives
Evaluate Options
Scope Definition
Business Analyst Delivery Plan
Define Project Requirements
Support Implementation Through SDLC
Evaluate Value Added By Project

vardhini

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Re: Various steps followed by a Business Analyst
« Reply #3 on: December 10, 2016, 08:23:53 pm »
Business analysis is a multistage process aimed at identifying and defining the requirements that must be fulfilled to achieve the business objectives.
The process of business analysis starts after the business requirements are documented and the BRD (Business Requirements Document) is available.

1. Plan business analysis process
Activities are better managed if you plan how to achieve them and thus the ‘Business Analysis plan’ contains the steps that will be followed to conduct the process of business analysis. The plan encompass:
Requirement management plan.
The listing of the stakeholders from which the requirements will be elicited.
The techniques which will be used to extract requirements.
The templates of different documents that will be created in the course of requirement gathering.
Details of shared locations where the documents will be stored.
Documents validation and review process.
Mode of communications (including frequency) of the business analyst with the other stakeholders.
Tracking and versioning details for the documents.
The above things, if properly planned, documented and followed will extensively contribute to the overall success of the project.

2. Define Scope
Project scope defines what all is expected to be achieved by the project so as to be considered complete and successful. It includes:
Description of the Project scope.
What is within the scope and what is out of the scope
Deliverables to be accomplished.
The acceptance criteria of the deliverables
Any constraints against the project.
Assumptions taken for the project.
A business analyst works closely with the project manager and the key stakeholders of the project to define the project scope statement and the project scope. All the requirements that are included in the project scope should be carefully validated against the project’s business requirement document (BRD)/business case.

3. Elicit requirements
Once the project scope statement is defined we must strive to get as much information as possible regarding all the requirements of the project. Elicitation is the part of business analysis where a business analyst communicate and liaise with all the stakeholders, understand their needs and document the requirements of the solution that needs to be developed.
 As a refresher a business analyst will conduct interviews, workshops, observation, questionnaire and prepare prototypes to get requirements out of the stakeholders.
Elicitation is not an easy exercise since one needs to get in touch with all the stakeholders involved, understand their needs and spend considerable amount of time trying to comprehend the demands. This is an important phase of the project where the business analyst should be careful not to miss any requirement or stakeholder.

4. Validate the requirements
Once the requirements are captured they must be validated against the business requirements/business case of the project. Some stakeholders might demand features that are out of the project scope and the business analyst should highlight any such requirements. These requirements should be brought to note of the other stakeholders and discussed whether they should be discarded or could be part of future phases of the project.
Additionally, there might be some technical constraints that will hinder the achievement of a requirement. In such cases, the business analyst should closely work with the technical architects, technical leads and come up with workarounds. These workarounds should then be discussed and agreed upon with the client/other stakeholders.

5. Analyze requirements
Till now we have discussed about how to gather data about ‘what’  the solution is expected to achieve but it is equally important to define ‘how’  these requirements will be achieved. The elaboration of this ‘how’ is a part of the analyze requirements process. Let’s go through the things that are the part of this process:
Prioritize the requirements for their validity and any associated risks (technical, infrastructural or schedule).
Deduce inter-dependencies between requirements.
Create data model.
Crate domain model.
Create process flow diagram.
Create process interface model.
Deduce any technical or business constraints and related assumptions.
Validate the correctness of the requirements.

6. Document requirements
Once the requirements are properly elicited and analyzed, it’s time for them to get documented. Documenting requirements is a tricky exercise where both technical knowledge and writing skills are equally important. Since there are many audiences of the documents prepared by the business analyst belonging to different competencies in an organization (technical, business, etc.), excessive care should be taken while documenting requirements. A business analyst should note that:
Requirements should be crisp, clear and concise.
Requirements should be written in a simple language.
In case of usage of technical terms, they should be defined in the glossary.
The documents should be versioned for ease of identification.
Documents should be reviewed for their correctness and exactness.
The document templates and nomenclature should be followed according to the Business Analysis plan/requirement management plan.
Requirement documents should be validated and approved by the key stakeholders.

Also, the different documents in which the requirements are stored are as follows:
Use case diagram
System requirements specification (SRS) document.
Activity diagrams


171525904

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Re: Various steps followed by a Business Analyst
« Reply #4 on: July 04, 2017, 02:10:25 pm »
Various steps followed after project kick off.

1) Business analysis planing and monitoring.
a)Planning business analysis approach
b)Planning Business analysis activities
c)Planing Business analysis communication ( Format and frequency of communication)
d)Planing Business analysis management  (change request,managing requirement,prioritization)

2)requirement gathering

a)stake holder identify and document
b)Preparing BRD consist ( stake holder requirement,stake holder list.Raci chart, Business rules Etc)
c)Preparing for elicitation
d)understanding organization and stake holders
e)understanding the scope of elicitation from solution scope and business case document
f)selecting elicitation technique based on various factors.
g)set up logistic ( activity goal,resources, equipment, place etc) 
h)secure supporting material.Historical data,organization policy and regulation,existing system document etc
i)preparing stake holder about elicitation technique and their role and the information they are supposed to provide.
j)conducting elicitation
k)document elicitation results
l)confirming elicitation result against the sources and against other elicitation result

3) Requirement analysis:
a) sorting requirement
b)Prioritizing requirement (MoSScow or 100 dollar tests or any other standard technique)
c)organizing requirement based relationship and dependencies
d)Modeling requirement
e)verifying requirement
f)validating requirement ( FURP,CUCV,SMART Etc)

4)Requirement Management and communication
a)Tracking requirement through different phases of SDLC to ensure no requirement miss any functionality.and track status of requirement.
b)maintaining requirement attributes ( owner, author, priority, complexity,relationship)
c)maintaining requirement for re-use
d) managing requirement relationship
e)Structuring requirement for clearing understanding of stake holder ( preparing packages) deciding which format requirement should be presented in.

5)solution evaluation and  implementation
a) assessing solution
b)allocating requirement
c)assessing organization readiness
d)solution validation
e)solution evaluation
f)solution implementation 
 

111222333

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Re: Various steps followed by a Business Analyst
« Reply #5 on: September 18, 2017, 04:04:34 pm »
1.Gather background information.
Whether a project is brand new or existing, it’s crucial for the business analyst to gather a significant amount of background
information on the project. The information may highlight various points:
•What domain is the project under
•Determine the various circumstances that could potentially affect the business strategy for the project

2.Identify stakeholders.
The stakeholders on a project are the ones who make decisions and sign off on requirements and priorities. Therefore, identifying all of the stakeholders early on is important such as who are the owners, managers, employees, partners, customers, competitors, etc.

3.Discover business objectives
A few techniques to assist in establishing business objectives for a project are:
•Benchmarking
•SWOT analysis
•focus groups and brainstorming
•documenting and conveying business objectives

4.Evaluate options
A business analyst can prepare a business case based on the narrowed down options, using:
•Cost-benefit analysis — looks at cost of pursuing an action and the benefits of that action
•Impact analysis — identifying and presenting actions that affect the project or company that would factor into pursuing an action
•Risk analysis — various risks that can be involved in pursuing an action

5.Scope definition
The scope definition document can include:
•Development items in scope
•Development items out of scope
•Integrations in scope
•Integrations out of scope

6.Business analyst delivery plan
The business analyst and project owner will provide a detailed timeline for delivering the requirements to the development team. A timeline for the requirements will be provided based on factors such as:
•Stakeholders and their availability
•Project scope
•Project methodology
•By dividing requirements into deliverables and providing realistic dates for each of them, this will help plan resources and project timelines accordingly.

7.Define project requirements
This step requires the business analyst to clarify requirements to the business owner and get the OK to deliver them to the development team. Requirements can be divided into functional and non-functional.

8.Support implementation through SDLC
A business analyst is involved through the technical implementation of requirements to ensure that everything aligns. There are a few steps during this phase:
•Reviewing the technical deliverables to align with requirements
•Based on feedback from the development team, update or repackage requirements to facilitate implementation
•Engage with quality analysts to ensure requirements are tested and requirements are understood
•Manage changes from the business owner that are requested once the initial requirements are delivered and implemented
•Facilitate user acceptance once the requirement implementation is done

9.Evaluate value added by project
•Evaluate the actual progress across the timeline and business objectives, and provide stakeholders updates and answer questions
•Based on the progress and feedback, suggest any modifications or initiatives required to realign the implementation phase with business objectives.

1170220109

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Re: Various steps followed by a Business Analyst
« Reply #6 on: October 18, 2017, 05:19:20 pm »
Various steps followed by Business Analyst are:

Step 1 – Get Oriented
Often as business analysts we are expected to dive in to a project and start contributing as quickly as possible to make a positive impact. Sometimes the project is already underway. Other times there are vague notions about what the project is or why it exists. We face a lot of ambiguity as business analysts and it’s our job to clarify the scope, requirements, and business objectives as quickly as possible.
But that doesn’t mean that it makes sense to get ourselves knee-deep into the detailed requirements right away. Doing so very likely means a quick start in the wrong direction.
Taking some time, whether that’s a few hours, few days, or at the very most a few weeks, to get oriented will ensure you are not only moving quickly, but also able to be an effective and confident contributor on the project.
Your key responsibilities in this step include:
Clarifying your role as the business analyst so that you are sure to create deliverables that meet stakeholder needs.
Determining the primary stakeholders to engage in defining the project’s business objectives and scope, as well as any subject matter experts to be consulted early in the project.
Understanding the project history so that you don’t inadvertently repeat work that’s already been done or rehash previously made decisions.
Understanding the existing systems and business processes so you have a reasonably clear picture of the current state that needs to change.
This is where you learn how to learn what you don’t know you don’t know, so to speak. This step gets you the information you need to be successful and effective in the context of this particular project.

Step 2 – Discover the Primary Business Objectives
It’s very common for business analysts and project managers to jump right in to defining the scope of the project. However, this can lead to unnecessary headaches. Uncovering and getting agreement on the business needs early in a project and before scope is defined is the quickest path forward to a successful project.
Your key responsibilities in this step include:
Discovering expectations from your primary stakeholders – essentially discovering the “why” behind the project. (Our BA Essentials Master Class covers 7 different business analysis techniques that can be used as part of this discovery.)
Reconciling conflicting expectations so that the business community begins the project with a shared understanding of the business objectives and are not unique to one person’s perspective.
Ensuring the business objectives are clear and actionable to provide the project team with momentum and context while defining scope and, later on, the detailed requirements.
Discovering the primary business objectives sets the stage for defining scope, ensuring that you don’t end up with a solution that solves the wrong problem or, even worse, with a solution that no one can even determine is successful or not.

Step 3 – Define Scope
A clear and complete statement of scope provides your project team the go-forward concept to realize the business needs. Scope makes the business needs tangible in such a way that multiple project team participants can envision their contribution to the project and the implementation. 
Your key responsibilities in this step include:
Defining a solution approach to determine the nature and extent of technology and business process changes to be made as part of implementing the solution to the primary business objectives.
Drafting a scope statement and reviewing it with your key business and technology stakeholders until they are prepared to sign-off or buy-in to the document.
Confirming the business case to ensure that it still makes sense for your organization to invest in the project.
Scope is not an implementation plan, but it is a touchstone guiding all of the subsequent steps of the business analysis process and tasks by other project participants.

Step 4 – Formulate Your Business Analysis Plan
Your business analysis plan will bring clarity to the business analysis process that will be used to successfully define the detailed requirements for this project. Your business analysis plan is going to answer many questions for you and your project team.
Your key responsibilities in this step include:
Choosing the most appropriate types of business analysis deliverables, given the project scope, project methodology, and other key aspects of the project context.
Defining the specific list of business analysis deliverables that will completely cover the scope of the project and identifying the stakeholders who will be part of the creation and validation of each deliverable.
Identifying the timelines for completing the business analysis deliverables.
In the absence of defining a credible and realistic plan, a set of expectations may be defined for you, and often those expectations are unrealistic as they do not fully appreciate everything that goes into defining detailed requirements.

Step 5 – Define the Detailed Requirements
Detailed requirements provide your implementation team with the information they need to implement the solution. They make scope implementable.
Without clear, concise, and actionable detailed requirements, implementation teams often flounder and fail to connect the dots in such a way that delivers on the original business case for the project.  
Your key responsibilities in this step include:
Eliciting the information necessary to understand what the business community wants from a specific feature or process change.
Analyzing the information you’ve discovered and using it to create a first draft of one or more business analysis deliverables containing the detailed requirements for the project.
Reviewing and validating each deliverable with appropriate business and technology stakeholders and asking questions to fill in any gaps.
Effective business analysts consciously sequence your deliverables to be as effective as possible in driving the momentum of the project forward. Paying attention to the project’s critical path, reducing ambiguity and complexity, and generating quick wins are all factors to consider when sequencing your deliverables.

Step 6 – Support the Technical Implementation
On a typical project employing a business analyst, a significant part of the solution involves a technical implementation team building, customizing, and/or deploying software. During the technical implementation, there are many worthwhile support tasks for you to engage in that will help drive the success of the project and ensure the business objectives are met.
Your key responsibilities in this step include:
Reviewing the solution design to ensure it fulfills all of the requirements and looking for opportunities to meet additional business needs without increasing the technical scope of the project.
Updating and/or repackaging requirements documentation to make it useful for the technology design and implementation process.
Engaging with quality assurance professionals to ensure they understand the business context for the technical requirements. This responsibility may include reviewing test plans and/or test cases to ensure they represent a clear understanding of the functional requirements.
Making yourself available to answer questions and help resolve any issues that surface during the technical design, technical implementation, or testing phases of the project.
Managing requirements changes to ensure that everyone is working from up-to-date documentation and that appropriate stakeholders are involved in all decisions about change.
When appropriate, leading user acceptance testing efforts completed by the business community to ensure that the software implementation meets the needs of business end users.
All of these efforts help the implementation team fulfill the intended benefits of the project and ensure the investment made realizes a positive return.

Step 7 – Help the Business Implement the Solution
Your technology team can deliver a beautiful shiny new solution that theoretically meets the business objectives, but if your business users don’t use it as intended and go back to business-as-usual, your project won’t have delivered on the original objectives. Business analysts are increasingly getting involved in this final phase of the project to support the business.
Your key responsibilities in this step may include:
Analyzing and developing interim and future state business process documentation that articulates exactly what changes need to be made to the business process.
Training end users to ensure they understand all process and procedural changes or collaborating with training staff so they can create appropriate training materials and deliver the training.
Collaborating with business users to update other organizational assets impacted by the business process and technology changes.
This step is all about ensuring all members of the business community are prepared to embrace the changes that have been specified as part of the project.

Step 8 – Assess Value Created by the Solution
A lot happens throughout the course of a project. Business outcomes are discussed. Details are worked through. Problems, big and small, are solved. Relationships are built. Change is managed. Technology is implemented. Business users are trained to change the way they work.
In this flurry of activity and a focus on delivery, it’s easy to lose track of the big picture. Why are we making all these changes and what value do they deliver for the organization? And even more importantly, are we still on track? Meaning, is the solution we’re delivering actually delivering the value we originally anticipated?
Nothing creates more positive momentum within an organization than a track record of successful projects. But if we don’t stop and assess the value created by the solution, how do we know if we are actually operating from a track record of success?
Your key responsibilities in this step may include:
Evaluating the actual progress made against the business objectives for the project to show the extent to which the original objectives have been fulfilled.
Communicating the results to the project sponsor, and if appropriate, to the project team and all members of the organization.
Suggesting follow-up projects and initiatives to fully realize the intended business objectives of the project or to solve new problems that are discovered while evaluating the impact of this project.
After completing this step, it’s likely you’ll uncover more opportunities to improve the business which will lead you to additional projects. And so the cycle begins again!
 

1170944412

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Re: Various steps followed by a Business Analyst
« Reply #7 on: March 10, 2018, 01:11:40 pm »
A business analyst is acts a liaison between the client and the technical team, so it follows that they are the face of the technical team and all communications to the client happen through them. the primary responsibilities of the business analyst are three fold- Client interactions, Requirement gathering and Process Reengineering. The different responsibilities or steps that a BA would take at different stages of a project are as below
Pre-project stage- This is reserved for the Sr. Business Analyst who would typically assist in Enterprise analysis
o   Project kick-off stage- this is where the BA comes into picture wherein they conduct stakeholder analysis to identify the stakeholders of the project and also plans an approach strategy for every subsequent stage in the project.
o   Requirement gathering- the BA would here document the identified stakeholders and would start preparing the Business Requirement Document where they would document the requirements elicited using one of the elicitation techniques, sort the requirements, prioritise the requirements and validate the same.
o   Requirement analysis- At this stage the BA prepares the Functional Requirement document (FRD) from the business requirements, draws the use case and activity diagrams and prepares Software Requirement Specification document (SRS) that will have both technical and functional requirements. BA will then get clients to sign-off on the project and would prepare Requirement Traceability Matrix (RTM) from SRS. Using this RTM, BA will trace requirements throughout the project life cycle.
o   Design phase- BA would prepare test cases or assist test manager in preparing them using the use case diagram. They would also communicate with the client updating the status of the project and prepare them to drive UAT. They would initiate preparation of end user manuals
o   Coding phase- BA organises JAD sessions, clarifies any queries the tech team might have, they would update RTM and end user manuals
o   Testing phase- BA performs high level testing and prepares client for UAT. BA requests test data from the client. Updates RTM and End user manuals. Takes signoff on the Client project acceptance form
o   Deployment and Implementation- Forwards RTM to the client and PM, Coordinates completion of end user manuals and organises training sessions for end users

1180364703

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Re: Various steps followed by a Business Analyst
« Reply #8 on: June 01, 2018, 02:04:48 pm »
Once the Business requirements are received, BA will start figuring out what is expected from the client. Later, to get the detailed information on the project, elicitation techniques are used. After drawing out the requirements, the same are documented in SRS document.

The SRS document is sent for business approval. Once the approval is received, the requirements are communicated to Dev team so that the same can be implemented.
BA also gives walkthrough session to testers and is responsible for reviewing the test cases prepared by the testing team.

Thus, the role of BA starts from the scratch until the product goes live.

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Re: Various steps followed by a Business Analyst
« Reply #9 on: June 27, 2018, 11:47:15 am »
steps followed by BA:
1. he gathers requirements.
2. verifies the feasibility of the product.
3. designs wireframes.
4. prepares SOW and other business documents.
5. creates test plan.

Adithya Mahendra

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Re: Various steps followed by a Business Analyst
« Reply #10 on: February 25, 2019, 10:48:43 am »
Role Of a BA:

1. Pre-Project- To do Enterprise Analysis: SWOT, GAP, Root cause analysis, Decision Analysis, Market research, Feasibility study, Strategy Analysis, Project scope, Enterprise Architectural Framework and Project scope.    

2. Requirements Planning   
         1. Understand Assumptions and constraints along with the business rules and business goals.
         2. Plan Packages for big Projects. 
         3. Understand the project from PM
         4. Conduct Stakeholder Analysis
         5. Plan the BA approach strategy   

3. Requirements Gathering   
         1. Identify the Stakeholders.
         2. Client gives BRD or BA prepares BRD by interacting with the Client and uses elicitation Techniques
         3. Prototyping is done by BA to make the client give more specific requirements
         4. Sorting the gathered requirements
         5. Prioritize the requirements using MOSOW technique
         6. Validate requirements using FURPS.   
      
4. Requirements Analysis   
         1. Draws UML diagrams (Use case and activity)
         2. Prepares Functional requirements from Business and stakeholder requirements
         3. All architects come up with Technical requirements (SSD)
         4. SRS will have functional and technical requirement
         5. Takes signoff on SRS from the client. SRS is the first legal bonding doc between the business and the technical team.
         6. BA prepared RTA from the SRS before design phase starts
         7. BA traces how requirements are dealt at each phase of Development life cycle until UAT.    

5. Design   
         1. From Use case diagram, test manager or BA will prepare test cases.
         2. Communicates with the client on the design and solution docs.
         3. BA will initiate the preparation of end user manuals.
         4.  Updates RTM
         5. From Use case diagram Solution architect recommends Architecture of the IT solution
         6. DB architect uses Persistence classes and comes up with ER diagrams or DB schema
         7. GUI Designer will look into Transient Classes and designs all possible Screens for the IT solution   

6. Coding   
         1. BA organizes JAD sessions
         2. BA clarifies queries of Technical team during coding
         3. Developers refer Diagrams and transient of BA and code their unit
         4. Update end user manuals
         5. Update RTM
         6. Conducts regular status meetings with technical team and the client and tuning client for participation in UAT   

7. Testing   
         1. BA prepares test cases from the use cases or assists test manager to do so
         2. BA performs High level testing
         3. BA prepares client for UAT
         4. Test Data is requested by BA from client
         5. Updates End user manual
         6. Updates RTM
         7. Take signoff from the client on client project acceptance form   

8. Deployment and Implementation   
         1. Forwards RTM to client or the PM which should be attached to the project closure Document
         2. Coordinates to complete and share End user Manuals
         3. Plans and organizes training sessions for end users
         4. Prepares lessons learned from this project.    

1171835509

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Re: Various steps followed by a Business Analyst
« Reply #11 on: April 04, 2019, 03:39:45 pm »
A business analyst has several steps to follow.

1) To gather all the basic information regarding the project and understanding the requirements of the project.
2) To identify stakeholders such as owners, managers, suppliers, partners & customers.
3) To prepare the business objective which gives a clear vision about the project.   
4) To identify the best feasible options to be involved in the project.
5) To prepare a delivery plan where the BA and Project manager will prepare a timeline to deliver all the requirements to the internal teams.

Jayanth mangu

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Re: Various steps followed by a Business Analyst
« Reply #12 on: April 22, 2019, 04:50:40 pm »
What are the steps should we follow for an successful project

1191648502

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Re: Various steps followed by a Business Analyst
« Reply #13 on: May 12, 2019, 06:58:39 pm »
1.Gather background information- PESTLE Analysis
2.Identify Stake holders
3.discover Business Objectives- Benchmarking,swot analysis,SMART
4.Evalute options-feasibility
5.Scope defnition
6.Business analyst delivery plan
7.Defne project requirements
8.Support Implementation through SDLC

1190953311

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Re: Various steps followed by a Business Analyst
« Reply #14 on: December 16, 2019, 07:11:29 pm »
what steps followed to get job in IT sector?